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2022-10-25 - Agendas - FinalRm�� CITY OF IiFAYETTEVILLE ARKANSAS MEETING AGENDA City Council Transportation Committee Tuesday, October 25, 2022 5:30 pm or Immediately Following Agenda Session NOTICE: THE TRANSPORTATION COMMITTEE WILL BE HELD VIRTUALLY WITH NO PHYSICAL LOCATION TO ATTEND VIDEO CONFERENCING BY ZOOM WILL BE USED FOR THIS MEETING. TO REGISTER FOR THE MEETING GO TO THIS Registration Link Members: Sarah Bunch, Chairperson; Sonia Harvey; Holly Hertzberg; Mark Kinion City Staff: Chris Brown, Public Works Director/City Engineer; Terry Gulley, Asst. PW Director for Operations/Transportation Services Director Agenda: 1. New Business: A. Downtown Walkability Bond Project- B. Industrial Drive Construction Contract — A construction contract with Tomlinson Asphalt for the construction of the Industrial Drive project. (Staff requests a recommendation of approval from the Committee to the City Council) C. Active Transportation Plan — Presentation of updates to the Active Transportation Plan. (Staff requests a recommendation of approval from the Committee to the City Council) D. Traffic Calming Program Update i. Discussion of Appeals Process: The Transportation Committees powers and duties as set forth in City Code allows for an appeal of a Transportation Committee recommendation "by any Alderman". Therefore, any traffic calming decision may be appealed under the current City Code. The Committee may wish to consider changes to the policy to clarify what special circumstances or parameters may be relevant in an appeal. (Traffic Calming policy attached) 2. Adjourn Mailing Address: 113 W. Mountain Street www.fayetteville-ar.gov Fayetteville, AR 72701 CITY OF --� FAYETTEVILLE ARKANSAS TO: Chris Brown, Public Works Director FROM: Matt Casey, Engineering Design Manager DATE: 10/20/22 SUBJECT: Downtown Walkability Bond Projects STAFF MEMO Below is a summary of the projects that are being funded to date under the Downtown Walkability Project of the 2019 Transportation Bond Fund. Spring Street Lighting - $605,850 Church and Meadow - $448,874 Square Lighting — $133,126 Cultural Arts Corridor - $552,364 Downtown Parking Deck - $300,000 Total to Date - $1,740,214 Other Potential Projects include: Dickson Street - $200,000 Prairie and West - $3,190,000 West Ave — Meadow to Spring - $512,000 West Ave Lighting - $100,000 Total of Additional Projects - $ Grand Total - $5,430,214. Dickson Street is planned to be done with our in-house Transportation Division crews. Prairie and West will be bid out for a contractor to build. The West Ave. project from Meadow to Spring includes street improvements to the west side of the roadway and relocation of the overhead utilities to underground. West Ave. will be included in the Nabholz contract for the Cultural Arts Corridor project. Mailing Address: 113 W. Mountain Street www.fayetteville-ar.gov Fayetteville, AR 72701 CITY OF FAYETTEVILLE ARKANSAS W MEETING OF NOVEMBER 15, 2022 TO: Mayor and City Council THRU: Susan Norton, Chief of Staff Chris Brown, Public Works Director CITY COUNCIL MEMO FROM: Matt Casey, Engineering Design Manager DATE: October 20, 2022 SUBJECT: Approval of a construction contract subject to EDA approval in the amount of $2,178,659.65 with Tomlinson Asphalt for the Industrial Drive Extension Project, approval of a $218,000 project contingency and approval of a budget adjustment. RECOMMENDATION: Staff recommends approval of a construction contract subject to EDA approval in the amount of $2,178,659.65 with Tomlinson Asphalt for the Industrial Drive Extension Project, approval of a $218,000 project contingency and approval of a budget adjustment. BACKGROUND: The Industrial Drive project includes the construction of approximately 2,600 feet of street extension connecting South Industrial Drive to South City Lake Road. The street section includes a 28' wide asphalt street with curb and gutter and a 5' wide sidewalk with 6' of greenspace on one side. This proposed street extension will provide access to approximately 47 acres of city -owned land, allowing the development of five parcels. In September of 2020, the City of Fayetteville was awarded a grant from the Economic Development Administration for 80% of the design and construction of this project not to exceed $2,000,000. The City will be responsible for the other 20% of project costs estimated to be $500,000. On April 6, 2021, the City Council approved a design contract with McClelland Consulting Engineers. DISCUSSION: On October 19, 2022, the City received four (4) construction bids for this project. Tomlinson Asphalt submitted the low bid of $2,178,659.65. Engineering staff recommends awarding this contract to Tomlinson Asphalt. The contract time is 300 days (10 months) for substantial completion. BUDGET/STAFF IMPACT: The design and construction of this project will be paid for with the funds from a grant from the Economic Development Administration ($1,742,927.72) and from the 2019 Economic Development Bonds ($435,731.93). Mailing Address: 113 W. Mountain Street www.fayetteville-ar.gov Fayetteville, AR 72701 Attachments: Construction Contract Budget Adjustment Figure 3. Proposed Project Preliminary Site Plan ' MARSHALLTOWN y TOOLS PROPOSED +� ` ' "�* `�'� o ; ,,�_, � w STREET d:�►, �� EXTENSION FAYETTEVILLE UTILITIES j ;: .,•.� I.;� * . ",'DEPARTMENT . 156 -. PPROX. 40' y •- " 218.0' r , s PROPOSED 5—FOOT PRESERVATION, ' SIDEWALK ,a/e . k -x. AREA t PROJECT,, ti SI TE TRIBUTARY TO D 0 WEST FORK 6 01 WHITE RIVER GREEN ➢E "'n�+"' SPACE WALK CURBS 4•� C1111& GUTTER CUTTER - F�12.5' LRNE�12.5' LANK 2b' BACK TE 9ACK 0 250 500 28' WIDE STREET 1 INCH = 500 FEET ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION GRANT APPLICATION . CITY OF Section 27, Township 16 North, Range 30 West � FAYETTEVILLE Fayetteville Quadrangle INDUSTRIAL DRIVE EXTENSION ' ARKANSAS UTM Coordinates:15 N 398M46 E 396784 PRELIMINARY SITE PLAN Cal EDA MW! MP,CXildi 3 'MS Alerth 2020 Fayetteville AR Industrial Drive Extension EDA Environmental Narrative 4 lKd PAGES 1-5 PAGES 6-14 PAGES 18-22 PAGES 22-31 PAGES 32 - 39 -OON11:i030l1[Mr 'glor Executive Summary, Community Development Pattern Chart 1 PE FtO■ D1AAMNLIP' Planning process, progress and timeline, existing conditions, the pedestrian network, shared use paved trails, Razorback Regional Greenway, ATP Plan Map, types of bike riders, bike network types, transit on benefits of biT1cTR1'Wd wal .3IX ldlly. CICU lJ. UdIJ of the ATP r Implementation and success metrics PAGES 40 - 44 4 IWementattion and success metrics ATP VISION AND SOALF The City envisions the ATP as the guiding document for identifying and prioritizing bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure improvements This plan is intended to be broad in scope and to provide a dynamic and timely framework for the decision making process. Ultimately, the vision for this plan is as follows: Fayetteville endeavors to develop and promote an inter- connected and universally accessible network of sidewalks, trails and on -street bicycle facilities that encourage citizens to use active/non-motorized modes of transportation to safely and efficiently reach any destination. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY In 2003, the City of Fayetteville adopted the Fayetteville Alternative Transportation &Trails (FATT) Plan, which laid out a vision for the de- velopment of a city-wide trail system. The FATT Plan was developed through an extensive public input process which resulted in a com- prehensive set of goals and objectives. At the time the FATT Plan was developed, Fayetteville had not yet committed to building the Scull Creek Trail that has become the backbone of our trails system. The FATT Plan served as a catalyst to initiate large-scale trail development and brought greater awareness of the benefits of alternative transportation networks. In April 2015, The City Council adopted the original version of this plan - the Active Transportation Plan (ATP) by resolution. The ATP set forth a vision and a roadmap for measuring success, and it provides the gener- al parameters for the prioritization and design of bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure without prescribing solutions for specific projects. The 2015 ATP has served as a guiding document in the seven year since its adoption. This 2022 update the ATP builds on lessons learned and incorporates the recent developments and changes in best practices in Active Trans- portation planning. This plan's updated goals emphasize equity, safety and accessibility for all ages and abilities. INTRODUCTION Executive Summary iD A V Wl V , WHAT IS ACTIVE TRANSPOR ATION? Active transportation is any form of human powered transportation, e.g., walking, cycling, using a wheelchair, in -line skating or skateboarding. ACTIVE TRANSPORTATION PLAN Introduction WHAT IS MULTI -MODAL TRANSRTATION? Multi -modal refers to a range of mobility options; vehicular traffic, public transit, walking, bicycling and ride sharing that are effectively integrated to provide a high degree of accessibility for all users. WHAT ARE OOOCC 0&KOPOO E7&ffH H HEUWN0000? Just as motorized transportation networks connect destinations with an interconnected system of roadways, active transportation networks use trails sidewalks, bikeways and low stress streets to allow people to move freely and safely through a community without an automobile. Active Transportation planning should focus on providing maximum connectivity for all potential users while minimizing exposure to traffic risks. 0 INTRODUCTION Community Development Pattern Wa.. s-- High per capita car ownership High per capita motor vehicle mileage Automobile traffic is prioritized over pedestrian and bicycle use 'M. Generous supply, free Maximum traffic speeds ACTIVE TRANSPORTATION PLAN Introduction CAR OWNERSHIP Medium per capita car - ownership /may VEHICLE TRAVEL Medium to low motor vehicle mileage PRIORITY OF Non -drivers are prioritized and TRAVELERS their needs merit significant consideration Moderate supply, priced PARKING appropriately in high destination areas r. TRAFFIC SPEEDS Lower traffic speeds INTRODUCTION Community Development Pattern Chart _ Low with common destinations �. dispersed from residential areas ACTIVE TRANSPORTATION PLAN Introduction a .IL � —M LAND USE Medium to high with common DENSITY destinations and clustered f residential areas P ■ jr Primarily single use LAND USE MIX Abundance of mixed -use development patterns development patterns - " Large amounts of land devoted LAND AREA FOR Medium amounts of land devoted to to roads and parking TRANSPORTATION roads and parking _! Qu r - ��. Buildings are placed at the street with Parking is placed in front of buildings SITE DESIGN parking behind or at the side INTRODUCTION Community Development Pattern Chart ef ACTIVE TRANSPORTATION PLAN Introduction Streets designed primarily for Streets designed to support multiple - STREET DESIGN —� automobile traffic modes and users -_ r .a r _ Large scale streets and blocks STREET SCALE Medium to small streets and blocks Low levels of street connectivity with STREET High levels of street connectivity abundant cul-de-sacs CONNECTIVITY with numerous intersections iyy � Walking can be hazardous and Walking is pleasurable on most public is primarily undertaken by those WALKING streets and is a safe and efficient alternative unable to afford a car to driving for many daily activities r Non -drivers are a small minority with PLANNING Planning places a high value on ` little political influence PRACTICES transportation modal diversity I �. lk •IIIJ DI ANNING c)ROCESS The ATP has been developed with information gathered from a wide variety of planning studies and public input overtime. This plan recognizes that exceptional bicycle and pedestrian planning, design and implementation occurs at many levels and is influenced and guided by a variety of plans, policies and advocates. In developing the Active Transportation Plan, staff incorporated data, best practices and input from a wide variety of sources including: • 2003 Fayetteville Alternative Trails and Transportation Plan • Recommendations from the League of American Bicyclists • Recommendations from the NWA Bicycle and Pedestrian Plan developed with help from Alta Planning for the NWA Regional Planning Commission and endorsed by the Fayetteville City Council • City Plan 2040 and the City of Fayetteville's Master Street Plan • Specific neighborhood plans adopted by the City, including: Walker Park, Fayette Junction and the Wedington Corridor Plan • The City of Fayetteville's annual sidewalk plan developed by the Transportation Services Department • The 2018 Mobility Plan • Generous public input from participants in the above plans, programs, and policies • The Active Transportation Advisory Committee including 5-year trail prioritization plan NWA Regional Planning Commission CITY PLAN 2040 FAYETTEVILLE, ARKANSAS n4i;IF-0 FAYETTEVILLE MOBILITY PROGRESS AND TIMELINE The City of Fayetteville has made enormous progress in the development of bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure since the adoption of the FATT Plan in 2003. Some notable accomplishments include: the completion of Scull Creek Trail in 2008 that serves as the backbone of the City's trail system and became part of the Razorback Regional Greenway in 2015, the adoption of a complete street policy through the adoption of a Mas- ter Street Plan and complete street cross -sections in 2005, the completion of the Dickson Street enhancement project in 2004. Fayetteville has earned numerous awards including a silver Bicycle Friendly Community designation from the League of American Bicyclists, ranked in the top 10 Bike City designation from People for Bikes and was named the first official Bike City in the US by the International Cycling Union. Trails In house Trail Coordinator Construction Crew The Trails position created inTransporta- Bicycle Task Force Advisory Group created in Parks tion Division composed formed to discuss was created as and Recreation of 9 member crew and possibility of major a citizen group Department $893,149 allocated for bicycle transportation with the goal of Sidewalks and 2005 with $1.3 million way throughout the City adopting a trail Trails Coordinator The Sidewalk and recurring master plan hired Trails Advisory 1981 Committee was 2003 1978 established by 1997 Resolution Trail Design Program #71-01 moved to Engineering 19894 : Division IIIIIIIIIIIIIM i Citizens Mud Creek Trail e researched ; ; City awarded completed concept of a : Resolution #2-81 1993 T-21 federal : bikeway system funding for began with approved the trail projects surveyof bicycle first master 1996 y Bikeways Plan for Fayetteville use among the City The City re- 2001 Alternative residents 1 980 ceived $400,000 Transportation & in ISTEA funding Trail Master Plan for trail projects adopted by City Council by Resolution #131-03 O 2009 a 2006 • Fayetteville earned Bronze Bicycle Friendly • Community Scull CreekTrail ; designation completed ; • 2008 Frisco Trail completed zoio Sidewalk&Trails Task Force became ATAC (Alternative Transportation Advisory Committee) Northwest Arkansas Regional Planning Commission awarded Fayetteville a grant to build Clear Creek Trail & Frisco Trail Southern Extension, made pos- sible through a grant from the Walton Family Fminrlatinn 2012 Z014 a Razorback Regional Greenway opened Design Grant 2013 2015 awarded to the City for Frisco Walton Family Trail southern Foundation funded a extension portion of Cato Spring Trail design Walton Family Foundation funded a portion of Town Branch Trail construction Fayetteville sections of Razorback Greenway are completed Bicycle Coordinator hired 2019 Old Wire Cycle Track • completed e Fayetteville Awarded Silver Bicycle Friendly Community Award Fayetteville awarded Bike City designation by the Union Cycliste Internationale (UCI) Fayetteville hosted Cyclocross World Championships Centennial Park 2021 : opened Niokaska CreekTrail completed Voters approved $6.9 million in bond funding for trail construction Bozo zozz Clabber CreekTrail Extension completed EXISTING CONDITIONS As of 2022, Fayetteville's pedestrian network is made up of 435 miles of existing public sidewalks and 52 miles of existing shared - use paved trails. The sidewalk map shows where existing sidewalks are located and where gaps exist. Each year Capital Improvement Program funds are allocated for an annual sidewalk budget in the City's Public Works Department for sidewalk construction and main- tenance. Additional funding also comes through local bond funding and State and Federal grants. Construction of sidewalks is required for most new development along public streets. The 2018 Mobility Plan included a sidewalk and trail prioritization and evaluating matrix. This approach considers the relative benefits of each proposed project including gap closures, equity, economic benefit and well as construction feasibility. This data -driven ap- proach helps guide decisions from staff, citizen committees and elected officials to determine which sidewalk and trail projects are selected for each year's work plans. * IT IS IMPORTANT TO LOOK AT EACH ACTIVE TRANSPORTATION MODE IN DETAIL IN ORDER UNDERSTAND HOW IT FITS INTO THE LARGER MULTI -MODAL TRANSPORTATION NETWOF THE PEDESTRIAN NETWORK Presently, Fayetteville's pedestrian network is made up of 435 miles of existing public sidewalks and 5 miles of existing shared -use paved trails. Geographic Information System (GIS) mapping is used to ide fy where existing sidewalks are located and where gaps exist. Traditionally, Capital Improvement Prog funds have been allocated for an annual sidewalk budget in the City's Transportation Department to I new sidewalks or to rebuild and replace existing damaged or inadequate sidewalks. Additional fundir also come through State and Federal grant for sidewalk construction. Construction of sidewalks is req for most new development along public streets. As a result of this requirement, 238 miles of sidewalk. - built from 2003 to 2022 by private developers. This plan provides the framework for identifying and p ing sidewalk improvements in the future. Future sidewalk planning will emphasize improving connec throughout the existing network by connecting densely populated areas to key destinations such as I schools and businesses. before reconstruction AWW during reconstruction after reconstruction 10 Shared -use paved trails, are the centerpiece of Fayetteville's active transportation network. Share -use paved trails offer complete separation from traffic and provide a comfortable experience for users of all kinds. Shared -used paved trails can also offer more direct routes than street networks which sometimes do not connect in ways useful for people walking or riding bicycles. Construction costs associated with shared -use paved trails are considerable. Much like our sidewalk program, trails are funded through dedicat- ed Capital Improvement Project funds and additional public and private grant sources. Privately built trails cost upwards of $300 per linear foot or $1.6 million per mile. The City of Fayetteville's in-house design and construction model delivers trail projects at approximately 50 percent of the cost of those built by private contractors. Despite the high cost the return -on -investment in these trails has show to be positive. In a 2018 re- port funded by the Walton Family Foundation showed that bicycling brought more than $137 million in economic benefits* to Northwest Arkan- sas annually.The annual economic benefits associated with the regional trail network are equivelant to the cost of 85 miles of shared use paved trail each year. 30 MILE 1� 00 C% O N M RT V1 O n Go 1 M O1 N O O O71 7 7 N N N TRAIL AND SIDE PATH CONSTRUCTION MILEAGE OVER THE PAST 18 YEARS. * https://www.waltonfamilyfoundation.org/our-work 11 RAZORBACK REGIONAL GREENWAY MAP Northwest Arkz 11 Razorback The Razorback Regional Greenway is a 40-mile shared -use paved trail that 4 Re_o °Gr°easaY includes more than 11.5 miles of Fayetteville's locally built trails and serves as the primary active transportation corridor for the region. The Razorback Regional Greenway opened in the spring of 2015 and spans across six ❑ ❑ NWA municipalities, connecting dozens of popular community destinations. ❑ A Federal Department of Transportation TIGER grant was matched by the - > Walton Family Foundation to secure $38 million to fund construction of the regional portions of the Greenway. EAPPLFRvvn / Z ?A FAYETETVILSL'E W DRAKesr= ❑ p W > ¢ Q • • C W G W 2 F a�0 w O �� ¢ W to � •� P > ❑ 0 2 LU J ❑ Z O Luit tiQ 0 ? ti O UNBRIDGE DR w O Z 2 y Z W K ❑ Z = w Gulley > y w Z ECENTURY wZ D Park Z ■ o E TOWNSHIP ST o _j w N ❑ N h Z p 3 g ! O • J E PEEL STZ E STEWART ST � rw Lu w Z of a. Ix tY ❑ z ELM ST 0 Z O 2 �4 w f ❑ w E ELM ST Z3 w 00 LAR ST P LAR ST v Z It Z W IL R ST w ¢ 2 O H ST W LU SH T tr X Ir w NB WASH ST z ❑ Lu E ASH ST w w CAMOR ST E SYCA ORES ¢ 3 CHARLEE ST E VIE OIN Z Ir > Z Clarence Craft Lu Gregory a Brooks -Hummel = Park E Nature U Park y Z 4rJ preserve W v BACKGROUND Active Transportation Plan Map The Active Transportation Plan Map illus- trates the location of the existing and future trail system and on -street bicycle facilities. This map is adopted by a resolution of the City Council and it serves as the official map for directing the development of active trans- portation infrastructure. City Staff utilizes the map to prioritize City -led infrastructure im- provements. The Active Transportation Plan Map is also used to inform land owners and developers of future trail corridors for plan- ning and development purposes. The official map is updated periodically and is available on the City of Fayetteville's website. X4 ID -a ACTIVE TRANSPORTATION PLAN Background Since the adoption of the 2015 Active Transportation Plan new research and guidance from the National Association of City Planning Officials (NACTO) the Federal Highway Administration and others has shifted the standards and best practices for on -street bicycle infrastructure. In order to attract new users, bicycle infrastructure must be appropriate for All Ages and Abilities. This philosophy means creating a low -stress network of streets and providing greater protection and buffer space from vehicular traffic to accommodate people who do not feel safe sharing the road with automobiles. Percentages from the Federal Highway Department show how people interested in riding bicycles vary in their comfort levels in various street environments. PERCENT BREAKDOWN RIDERSHIP INTEREST DOES NOT RIDE A BIKE People who do not ride bikes. 12% SOMEWHAT CONFIDENT Bicyclists who will ride on most streets, but prefer trails or streets with bicycle infrastructure. 4/o O HIGHLY CONFIDENT Bicyclists who are willing to ride on almost any type of steet. Traditional 5-foot bike lanes can be useful in certain applications such as climbing lanes; however, a single line of paint is generally not adequate in providing the safety and comfort to accommodate riders of all ages and abilities. Future on -street bikeways should incorporate best practices for bet- ter seperation for people riding bikes from fast moving traffic. When street widths are constrained two-way bike facilities should be considered. Vertical physical protection, curbs, buffer spaces, green paint, markings in intersections and conflict areas area all useful in increasing safety and comfort for people riding bikes on streets. INTERESTED SOMEWHAT HIGHLY BUT CONCERNED CONFIDENT CONFIDENT SEPARATED BIKE FACILITY T \/ r% r !" A r !" T r% r r T T r% r A T A A r IL I T US Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration https:Hsafety.fhwa.dot.gov/ped—bike/tools—solve/docs/fhwasa 18077.pdf ME BACKGROUND Transit TRANSIT + MICROMOBILITY Fayetteville is served by two public transit agencies, Razorback Transit and Ozark Regional Transit. Both agencies are totally fare -free for everyone. Funding forth etransit agencies comes from a variety of federal, state, and local sources. Razorback Transit ridership surpassed 2 mil- lion rides in 2015 but has declined in subsequent years, and in 2020 ridership fell by more than 50% due largely to the COVID 19 Pandemic. Ridership is rebounding, however travel patterns have changed with the introduction of micromobility. Micromobility refers to the use of a range of small shared or privately -owned mobility devices such as electric scooters and bicycles. Micromobility has grown in popularity in Fayetteville with the launch of bike share in 2018 and with subsequent electric scooter shared programs. Fayetteville's paved trails and large student population has attracted investments from mi- cromobility industry. In 2021 nearly half -million rides were taken using Fayetteville shared electric scooter programs. E-Scooters are not fully considered to be active transportation, but these vehicles offer a crucial last mile connection for multi modal trips and encourage new users to explore Fayetteville's trails and bikeways. ACTIVE TRANSPORTATION BENEFITS Transportation Benefits of Biking and Walking 1 0 • The benefits of planning and constructing a robust active t transportation network can improve a ■ community in many ways. Benefits include; an enhanced quality of life, the promotion of healthy lifestyles, • environmental benefits and economic resiliency. ACTIVE TRANSPORTATION PLAN Active Transportation Benefits = THE NUMBER OF POUNDS THE AVERAGE PERSON WILL LOSE IN THEIR FIRST YEAR OF BIKING TO WORK lblb lb alb lb lb alb alb alb alb alb lb lb Outdoor Foundation. (2010). 8 ACTIVE TRANSPORTATION BENEFITS Transportation Benefits of Biking and Walking balance........ Cycling produces the balance between exertion and relaxation which is important for the body's inner equilibrium. heart..................................... All the risk factors that lead to a heart attack are reduced. Regular cycling reduces the likelihood .............. of heart attack by more than 50%. waistline....... Cycling is ideal for targeting problem areas. It enables people who can not move easily to exercise. It increases fitness and stimulates the body's fat metabolism. coordination Moving both feet around in circles while steering with both your hands and your body's own weight is good practice for your coordination skills. :....mental health Cycling has a relaxing effect due to uniform movement which stabilizes physical and emotional functions. It reduces anxiety, depression and other psychological problems. ACTIVE TRANSPORTATION PLAN Active Transportation Benefits .......back pain Cycling posture is optimum, and the cyclic movement of the legs stimulates muscles in the lower back. ............................. muscles A week of inactivity reduces the strength of the muscular system by up to 50% and can harm muscles long-term. During cycling, most of the body's muscles are activated. ........joints The circular movement of cycling assists the transport of energy and other metabolic producers to the cartilages, reducing the likelihood of arthrosis. 19 Davis, Cavill. (2007). "Cycling and Health: what's the evidence?" Cycling England EQUITY ACTIVE TRANSPORTATION FOR EVERYONE. Safe enjoyable places to walk and ride bicycles should be inclusive and easy to access for all. Investments in sidewalks, trails, crosswalks and bikeways should be made equitably with considerations for demographic factors such as neighborhood income levels, racial diversity, and language. Fayetteville's poverty rate of 22.9%. reflects a large number of low-income residents. According to a 2016 Community survey, lower income residents are less likely to own automobiles and are more likely to walk or bike for daily transportation needs. Continued and sustained investments are needed for underserved, low-income and minority neighborhoods to reduce disparities in health and economic outcomes for disadvantaged residents. * https://www.fayetteville-or.gov/3215/Community-Survey ENVIRONMENT I ENVIRONMENTAL BENEFITS FOR THE COMMUNITY An accessible active transportation network is essential for an environmentally sustainable community. According to 2019 data from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency the transportation sector contributes 29% of all greenhouse gas emissions with signal occupancy vehicles having the most emissions be mile traveled. Active transportation also helps to address land use challenges by reducing the amount a space needed to be paved for parking lots and roads. A typical automobile parking space is large enough to park 20 bicycles and it's possible to move. ' MASS TRANSIT (1/4 FULL) ' • AIRPLANE AVERAGE CAR 1*57 TRUCK OR SUV ECONOMIC RESILIENCY BENEFITS FOR THE COMMUNITY Economic resiliency is a key benefit of having a robust active transportation network. Economic resiliency can be measured broadly, at the community level, or narrowly as the benefits and costs to an individual or family. The Housing and Transportation (H+T) Index established by the Center for Neighborhood Technology measures Oav- erage housing and transportation costs as a percentage of income.The average Fayetteville household spends 24% of its income on transportation. Fayetteville's data compares favorably to relative transportation costs other parts of Arkansas such as Russellville (31 %) or Fort Smith (29%). Housing prices are also positively correlated with walkability. Rental Studies of the popular walkability metric"Walk Score" have shown that a one -point increase in a property's Walk Score will increase a property's average value by ECONOMIC $3,250 or .9 percent. Local economies are impacted negatively by the high transportation costs associated with an automobile -oriented land use and transportation network. Multi -modal transportation systems that include extensive active transporta- tion components are less expensive to construct, operate and maintain. $308 An T $8,220 PLAN VISION AND GOALS Goals ACTIVE TRANSPORTATION PLAN Plan Vision and Goals "Fayetteville endeavors to develop and promote an interconnected and universally accessible network of sidewalks, trails and on -street bicycle facilities that encourage citizens to use active/non-automotive modes of transportation to safely and efficiently reach any destination: PLAN VISION AND GOALS Goals _ "''jvjJ "-ft- = m__ - P L AN DAimm: x ' STRIVE TO CREATE AN EQUITABLE MULTI -MODAL TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM FOR ALL AGES AND ABILITIES. tN2 BUILD A PAV RAIL CONNECTION WITHIN ATEN-MINUTE WALK OF EVERY RESIDENCE BY 2040. 3 ENCOURAGE NEW PARTICIPATION IN ACTIVE TRANSPORTATION - GATHER AND EVALUATE DATA TOTRACKTRENDS AND MEASURE SUCCESS rf ZERO FATALITIES OR SEVERE INJURIES OF VULNERABLE ROAD USERS BY 20\30. 5 IMPLEMENT ALL OF THE APPROPRIATE RECOMMENDATIONS FROM LEADING ADVOCACY ORGANIZATIONS COMMUNITY EVALUATIONS. , - .. .i .. .• -1..�;-. _ Ate:.,. __, y,. _'... M._. � - ENHANCE OPPORTUNITIES FOR PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES TO WALK, ROLL, CYCLE, AND 6 USE MICROMOBILITY SERVICES AND OTHER INNOVATIVE MOBILITY TECHNOLOGIES TO THE GREATEST EXTENT POSSIBLE. ACTIVE TRANSPORTATION PLAN Plan Vision and Goals r „r _Awl- , GOAL Developing an equitable multi -modal transportation system means everyone having the freedom to safely move throughout the city using any transportation mode of choice. City Plan 2040's goal of creating a"Livable Transportation Network" and the City's adopted complete street policy, public street cross -sections and Master Street Plan. Multi -modal refers to a range of mobility op- tions; vehicular traffic, public transit, walking, bicycling and ride sharing that are effectively integrated to provide a high degree of accessibility for all users. A multi -modal transportation system has several significant benefits for the community including: promot- ing an active and healthy lifestyle, expanding mobility options for all users, reducing overall travel costs for residents and providing environmental benefits through the reduction of traffic conges- tion and associated air pollution. Success in this goal area can be quantified by measured increases in bike and pedestrian trips using trail counts, community surveys and by achieving a more balanced mode share between automotive, walking, biking, transit and other modes of travel. 0 GOAL The previous version of the ATP set a goal of building a trail within a half mile of every resident. This updated goal of building a connected trail within a 10-minute walk of every residence takes into account barriers such as street connectivity and waterways that can block access to trails for residents even when within a half mile of a trail. This goal emphasizes need for greater connectivity and the benefits of small trail and side- walk projects that can connect people to the larger network. Once completed, the Fayetteville trail system will include approximately 100 miles of shared -use paved trails. The pedestrian shed maps show the current conditions and models of future proximity as the trail network is built out. At the current rate of trail construction, it is estimated the City will have achieved this goal by 2040.This goal is essential to ensuring that the trails system and its benefit are inclusive for all residents regardless of the location of their residence. Success will be measured through location - al data collected by the City of Fayetteville Geographic Information Systems Division. 2 MILE 1 mite '\p2 M/4F Wd.0 TRAIL SYSTEM IN 2017 o O of the Fayetteville's residents lived within a o 01 10-minute walk of the trail system. ' 3 P F Tontitown a _ - - ••_ :Hwy 112 I ' 9 J. A'-- *65 � > < Blvd f° oa i i Mi -- Inaton� -- Dr— 11112s 9 r� IT I 45 0 0 i m o u Huntsvi t --46 4 Main St • _.._.._.._.._.._. 462 0:.. I i i _ MMM" ' i -•i.._i.._.._. 0 o _. �. Farmington _..i ao'.. x 7. _.. _ • IyQ i ..0700 +� 6 I ~ Wi11o4 .._.._.. 1_•1 TRAIL SYSTEM IN 2022 60(-o-)g/C, of the Fayetteville's residents live within a o10-minute walk of the trail system. _ '•-' Existing Paved Trail Area Within 10-Minute Walk- c. _ ' City Limits Tontitown F 1 a F I Wil/o4ghby VA a �_ j •a•1 i 2040 Tontitown TRAIL SYSTEM o T Do of the population will live within 10 minute walk of all proposed trails. i B ainst_.._.._..o.._.._ 462 • Farmington00 i ti C 0 0 a E _ Lake iF Fayette, Johnson M 1 491B • • G �yh � m . . - 77 T 1 1 Q � G ' i. °o W�1104 hb K .c :_. i u iP'T- GOAL Fayetteville can grow the popularity of active transportation, by providing a variety of opportunities and incentives for people walking and riding bikes. Efforts such as celebration of National Bike Month, Bike -to -Work Day, Walk -to -School Days, community bike maps, route finding signage, bicycle-themed celebrations and rides and commuter challenges can all help to engage and educate new bike, transit and walking commuters. Metrics are essential for measuring success. Infrastructure can be measured in miles of new sidewalks, trails and bike lanes but it is equally im- portant to measure the number of residents served by this infrastructure and community -wide usage. Trail counters, surveys as well as geospa- tial mapping technology can all be used to tell the story of how people move throughout Fayetteville's active transportation network. GOAL Vulnerable Roadway Users are people who are unprotected without physical separation from the roadway. Most often these individuals are engaged in active transportation - walking, biking, or other non -automotive transportation. Collisions involving Vulnerable Roadway Users and vehicles too often result in tragedy. Between 2011 and 2021 Fayetteville saw 244 pedestrian injuries and 16 fatalities. Equity and safety intersect on this topic as Vulnerable Roadway Users are disproportionately people of color, minorities and low-income residents. Fayetteville's rate of pedestrian fatalities is typical for an American community of its size however there is clearly work to be done in making our streets safer, especially for those most vulnerable. New approaches to road design and building a safer transportation system are needed to reduce and eliminate traffic related injuries and fatalities. GOAL The League of American Bicyclists evaluate communities' bike friendliness based on five categories Engineering, Education, Equity, Encourage- ment and Evaluation; this broad set of criteria is known as the 5 E's. Since first earning a bronze Bicycle Friendly Community designation in 2010 Fayetteville has improved its designation to silver and will strive for higher (gold and platinum) designations in the future. In 2017 the national bike advocacy group People for Bikes began ranking "bike cities" in North America based on bike network connectivity and community surveys. Fay- etteville has consistently ranked among the top U.S. cities including a #8 overall ranking in 2020. These programs recognize cities for successful efforts and provide critical feedback to identify weaknesses and areas for improvement. Imple- menting the recommendations from these leading organizations is key to improving bicycling in our community as well as earning community accolades. GOAL The Census Bureau defines disability as a long-lasting sensory, physical, mental, or emotional condition or conditions that make it difficult for a person to do functional or participatory activities such as seeing, hearing, walking, climbing stairs, learning, remembering, concentrating, dress- ing, bathing, going outside the home, or working at a job. Nearly 10% of Fayetteville residents have at least one disability. While this is lower than the nation average of 12.6%, disabilities are very prevalent in our community. Designing and planning for those with disabilities is an essential component of building a community that allows all people, notjust the able-bodied, to enjoy mobility and the freedom to move throughout their environment. It is critical for the City to take steps to prevent and remove unnecessary barriers to mobility in the public right of way and work with developers, businesses and transportation agencies to comply with ADA laws and to pursue innovative and accessible mobility options for all. * Civilian noninstitutionalized population. Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2011-2015 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates. https://www.disabled-world.com/disability/statistics/Scc.php 30 THE"5 E" RECOMMENDATIONS from the LEAGUE OF AMERICAN BICYCLISTS EQUITY, DIVERSITY & INCLUSION ENGINEERING EDUCATION ENCOURAGEMENT EVALUATION & PLANNING Apr 4 • TRI, CON THE L OF AMERICA hIC4 A bicycle friendly America for everyone Creating safe and convenient places to ride and park Giving people of all ages and abilities the skills and confidence to ride Creating a strong bike culture that welcomes and celebrates bicycling Planning for bicycling as a safe and viable transportation option 31 WALKABILITY Urban density is the first key to walkability. On average Fayetteville's population density is a relatively sparse 1,555 people per square -mile. Fayetteville's population density and associated walkability is not even- ly distributed across all areas of town. Fayetteville's core downtown and University -adjacent neighborhoods have connected sidewalks combined with significant concentration of housing, employment and commercial activity. These core areas of Fayetteville have Walk Scores above 80 and are categorized as "very walkable': In Fayetteville's most sparsely -popu- lated areas Walk Scores are in the single -digits and are considered almost entirely car dependent. ,r r �q,4:ow _• Walk ScorO"Q Walk Score is a measure of walkability based on population density, the number of destinations within walking distance of a particular address or within a neighborhood/city. FAYETTEVILLE'S COMMUNITY WALK SCORE IS 32 OUT OF 100 PLACING IT IN THE COMMUNITY CLASIFICATION. Walk Score &Ice Score 32 so WALKSCORE HEATMAP Farmington Appleby %)VI 11 17 Fayetteville Fayette Junction (E5 E� Habbert Wyman H a rri https://www.waIkscore.com/AR/Fayetteville 0 WALK SCORE Regardless of how densely or sparsely populated an area may be, safe enjoyable and direct walking routes are essential for the mobility and well- ness of every Fayetteville resident. Every Fayetteville resident should enjoy a safe walking environment starting from the street in front of their home. An appropriate walking environment can sometimes be achieved on low -volume residential streets. But most streets need pedestrian infrastructure including high -quality, acces- sible connected sidewalks and frequent safe crossings along roadways with higher speeds and volume of automobile traffic. The City's Public Works Department builds and maintains all of Fayetteville's sidewalk infrastructure that falls within the public right-of-way. A portion of the Capital Improvement Project budget is allocated annually for sidewalk construction and repair. The Public Works Department devel- ops an annual sidewalk plan that is presented for approval from the Active Transportation Advisory Committee (ATAC) and the City Council. Sidewalk projects are prioritized based on a scoring system that weighs a wide variety of factors including proximity to schools and the safety, economic and equity benefits relative to the cost of each project. Real-estate developers are generally required to build sidewalks when constructing residential or commercial projects in Fayetteville's planning jurisdiction. The City's min- imum street standards vary depending on street classification and dictate the standards to which developers must build sidewalks. In recent years minimum street standards have been updated to make sidewalks wider with greater amounts of greenspace separation between side- walks and the street. 4�m PLANNING Sidewalks serve as vital conduits for pedestrian movement and access. In highly walkable places sidewalks can activate the street by providing pedestrian space for social interactions and economic activity. Highly walkable places are comfortable and encourage walking with a dense mixture of land uses and building types in spaces that were designed at a human scale. This can be difficult to achieve in suburban places that were designed at the automobile scale, with wide streets, large building setbacks and an overabundance of surface parking lots. However, even highly suburban places may be retrofit- ted, densified and redeveloped into highly walkable places over time. This type of transformation is ambitious but possible with strong leadership, smart investment and sound planning. Planning for highly walkable development is prioritized in Fayetteville's comprehensive plan, City Plan 2040, with goals of promoting density through rezoning and infill development, discouraging sprawl, making traditional town form the standard and growing a livable transportation network. The following action steps should guide the planning process as it relates to pedestrian infrastructure. GE AVE 2015 FIN. iVNIN Conduct a gap analysis of sidewalk network to determine priority projects. Include greenspace separation and or street trees for all city and privately ENGINEERING & EVALUATION The City of Fayetteville's sidewalk construction and maintenance program has been upgrading Fayetteville's sidewalk network for decades. Earlier sidewalk projects along flat streets with ample right of way such as Rolling Hills Drive allowed for cost efficient and timely construction. However, many of the City's more recent projects such as East Dickson Street have been located in hilly terrain that requires major curb, gutter and storm drain improvements in order to add sidewalks. These much -needed hillside projects are expensive and present design and engineering challenges but bring environmental benefits beyond just walkable streets. As Fayetteville continues to be developed, stormwater runoff has become an increasing concern, the sidewalk construction program's projects and their associated drain- age improvements are more important than ever. The following action steps will help to guide the sidewalk program in order to create the greatest value for the most people regarding sidewalk construction. Focus on sidewalk connections to key destinations such as schools, parks, and entertainment and shopping areas. Reduce pedestrian exposure time while crossing at signalized and unsig- nalized crossings by reducing crossing distances with smaller radii, refuge islands and Leading pedestrian Intervals (LPI's). Implement priority recommendations from the Walk Friendly Communi- ties program. EQUITY recognize equity as a central value Liestablish measures to be achieved mplementation of interventions that will achieve equit *Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board ACTIONS Prioritize requests for sidewalks, crosswalks, trails and other pedestri- an projects based on needs of the most vulnerable populations first. Conduct gap analysis of sidewalk network to determine priorities. Emphasize efforts in neighborhoods that fall within Federally -des- ignated Areas of Persistent Poverty and Opportunity Zones. These neighborhoods have lower average incomes and lower rates of car ownership. Projects in these areas are more likely to qualify for grant funding. SAFETY & ENCOURAGEMENT Pedestrian comfort and safety is essential for creating highly walkable neighborhoods and commercial districts. In addition to basic design elements such as sidewalk width and surface condi- tion, features such as street trees for shade, reduced intersection crossing distance, lighting for night time safety and ADA compliant intersections, are critical for producing an adequate level of pedes- trian comfort. Pedestrians' real and perceived safety is increased when a buffer zone is present between the sidewalk and the adja- cent street traffic. In a dense urban environment, these may include parallel parking spaces, cycletracks or street trees. In less urban en- vironments, the sidewalk buffer may be comprised of a sufficiently wide planting zone with trees and ground cover. In either case, the idea is to offer pedestrian protection and physical separation from the moving vehicles. These actions are designed to integrate pe- destrian safety and comfort in the planning, design and engineer- ing process. STREET CROSS -SECTIONS The City of Fayetteville's complete street policy provides standards for developers building new streets and for the Public Works Department as they rebuild existing streets. This policy ensures that new streets include facilities for all transportation modes; vehicular, pedestrian and bicycle. Tr_2Z OM n7E)Unvun Mamz FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS Evaluate public and private development projects and require sufficient side- walk width for the anticipated volume of pedestrians. Prioritize pedestrian safety when redeveloping existing streets through the appropriate use of landscaped buffers, reduced curb radii at intersections where appropriate, on -street parking, bicycle infrastructure, street trees and signalized ADA compliant intersection design. Create separate pedestrian and bicycle facilities in areas where the combined active transportation network creates conflicts between the people walking and biking. Implement recommendations from the Active Transportation Advisory Committee for sidewalks and trails infrastructure projects. Make street intersections and trail crossings safer and more comfortable for pedestrians through the use of colored pavement markings, signage, medians, grade separation and signalization. BE CONSIDERATE PEDESTRIANS - LEARN MORE AT BIKE.UARK.EDU - - HAVE - PRIORITY • ►� . � i►' /yam► � 7ti �' . 5 • IJ . . + ♦�.� .tf it t �^�� • �� 1 _ ~ 1 ' �r• L~ •` i, ~+ t -� +r{{7 �-i �+r�� i�'s~t `C r*u; '��� 1�1`►-. jF 7+. { + " •. 1 Y lir = .r S� ■ �� ri 2 y�1 7 i;T Tr �y Memo PEED LIMIT ORDINAN .4 1 An ordinance to lower the default residential speed limit from 25 to 20 miles per hour was •��+ ���'=_���+ 7 r� passed unanimously by the Fayetteville City Council in 2021. ■ �4w "+i►�,;�: ■':�• - ".� ^_ •tom * ��ti� . + + r � ,k. ��•� .' • � ` ��r 'r ��_ +► '. 1 :� ~- t, 4. •� +��•I -.,�' � �.. '7F - `"i �, I ,,,yutiY.r f IN, - r 'E 3 r�+ i a ~"J.'N � :• �''_' f•. � vi■ *: w'� ` 4�, :�+,i �i. f [ �ti{ y� '�,� �a!7 .5, 1 •� 1 _.:f'.ti • T 4 y {�.' �, '. i!/ t , ;)" • ,� ,}�. -fir b 'i }; ' ±ov dd - � ! `^� . � tY e . ti, { .' �' n,i - �� • ` j •- � it � {.■ _ - 1 �t ISM WHY LOWER SPEED LIMIT? The ordinance amendment is intended to address community -wide concerns around neighborhood �� "�� ����■ speeding and pedestrian safety. The University of Arkansas showed support for lowering speed limits following two pedestrian fatalities on streets surrounding campus in recent years. The amendment was also supported by recommendations from the National Association of City Transportation ,.-- Officials, the City's 2018 Mobility Plan and City Plan 2040, which establishes desired operating speeds of 15-20 MPH for most residential streets. Research focused on pedestrian injuries and fatalities resulting from automobile collisions shows that the pedestrian mortality rate doubles when the speed of a car at time of impact is increased from 20 to 25 miles per hour. r , ���ssomm WaY Trail 1AM � low r„ilhPA LGA �i�r�bar� 7q1h 2.4 mi BID" m Way Tral l 'Y WAYFINDING As bicycle and trail networks mature, special attention should be paid to developing and installing appropriate wayfinding signs to provide users with information about direction, distance and destinations. Fortunately, the Northwest Arkansas Regional Bicycle and Pedestrian Master Plan adopted a universal wayfinding sign template that will be used throughout the region along the Razorback Regional Greenway. This signage will provide trail users with on -the -ground information to help them navigate the trail system without the aid of maps. On -street bicycle infrastructure should include directional signage alerting motorists to the presence of bicyclists on the streets. Lastly, the innovative use of temporary signage can be utilized to educate users on bicycle safety and etiquette along the trail. Invest in improvements to the community's on -street bike routes. All on - street routes should be well connected and comfortable for riders of all ages and abilities. STREET CROSS -SECTIONS The City of Fayetteville implemented a complete street policy in 2005 with the adoption of City Plan 2025 and the Master Street Plan. This policy en- sures that new streets include facilities for all transportation modes; vehicular, pedestrian and bicycle. However, many existing streets lack sidewalks and bicycle facilities. As part of the implementation of this plan, the City will begin to prioritize streets in need of retrofit, focusing on streets that connect the largest number of potential users to the rest of the active transportation network. RESIDENTIAL LINK NEIGHBORHOOD LINK REGIONAL LINK lo Sidewalk Pla tiSng strip ' �melane Orrve lane tM Pla tng strip 11 N D,1 elane Drrve lane Pla ting strip Sidewalk a CONNECT THE NETWORK The collection of accurate and relevant baseline data is key for under- standing the effectiveness of a bicycle network. The ongoing eval- uation of factors such as traffic speeds, transportation mode share counts, existing street cross -sections, percent of grade and other phys- ical barriers are all significant considerations when determining the appropriate engineering solution for a given project. Additionally, data collected from partnering advocate organizations such as the Trailblaz- ers or the Fayetteville Public Schools Safe Routes to School Program may be applicable and pertinent to the engineering design process. Major city streets that carry large amounts of motor vehicle traffic act as barriers to bicyclists because these roads are difficult to cross and generally lack bicycle facilities. Additionally, Fayetteville's hilly topog- raphy can present a barrier for lower classification streets that lack proper bicycle facilities such as sidepaths or on -street climbing lanes. The development of appropriate bicycle infrastructure in key loca- tions can provide safe connectivity that is lacking due to these exist- ing physical barriers. Moreover, portions of the existing trail network in Fayetteville are discontinuous, primarily because many trails have been constructed with development projects but have yet to be connected to the larger trail network. This problem of a disjointed trail network is typical of new and developing trail networks and will be overcome in time with private and public investments in bicycle infrastructure. Reapply for the League of American Bicyclists Bicycle Friendly Community program and implement recommendations to work toward gold or platinum designations. Implement recommendations from People for Bikes City Rankings program report card. Increase the budget for shared use paved trail construction to match inflation and increased construction costs. Partner with University of Arkansas to connect bicycle infrastructure projects on and around University campus and associated properties. Continue to support positions across all departments of the City of Fayetteville that work to further the goals of the Active Transportation Plan. Work with Fayetteville Public School district to expand bicycle education ef- forts to include K-2nd grade balance bike learning. Double the number of League of American Bicyclists designated Bicycle Friendly Businesses in Fayetteville to become national leader in this program. Partner with the Trailblazers and other bicycle advocates to expand encour- agement efforts during National Bike Month in May. This may include bicycle themed community events, campaigns and programs. 0 EDUCATION & ENCOURAGEMENT Education for bicyclists, drivers, pedestrians and those using micromobility is an important and ongoing effort to ensure the safety and comfort for all road- way and trail users. People riding bicycles have all the same rights and responsibilities as someone driving an automobile, however new State laws and city ordinances have made changes to the laws concerning cyclists. It is important to inform the public and increase popular understanding and awareness of these laws. Education is also key in encouraging new users, as confidence is gained through knowledge and experience. People will typically only engage in active transportation when they have a working knowledge of the active transportation network and an adequate understanding of the rules of the trails and of the roadways. Programs and events that celebrate bicy- cling in the community also help to grow the number of people riding bicycles for enjoyment who can begin riding for transportation. Work with schools to develop a safe routes to school plan to include alternate drop off locations to increase walking and biking by stu- dents and reduce traffic congestions around schools. Measure trail activity in consistent locations to collect year -over -year data. Conduct regular community transportation surveys to gauge partici- pation in active transportation and mode -share for transit, biking and driving. Track and report Vehicle Miles Traveled (VMT) to determine environ- mental impacts and trends in community driving levels. Work with Fayetteville Public School district to expand bicycle educa- tion efforts to include K-2nd grade balance bike learning. Double the number of League of American Bicyclists designated Bi- cycle Friendly Businesses in Fayetteville to become national leader in this program. a SAFETY & ENFORCEMENT Safety is an essential element of any comprehensive active transportation plan that must be included at every phase of planning, design and implementation. The single most significant factor influencing bicyclist safety is the number of cyclists on the road. A strong inverse correlation has been shown between bicycle mode share and accident rates; more cyclists make cycling safer overall. This principle of"safety in numbers"should be central to planning for safer bicycling in Fayetteville. The real or perceived safety of riding a bicycle in the street with cars close by is a major factor in people's travel mode choice. Streets with high vol- umes of high-speed automobile traffic can threaten the safety of bicyclists and deter would-be cyclists. Individuals with modest bicycling skills often called the "interested but concerned" cyclists, who represent the largest population of potential cyclists, are most often discouraged by safety concerns. Courses in bicycle safety for adults can help to encourage riders that may need to build confidence in their riding skills. Bike routes that limit cyclists' interaction with high -traffic conditions by utilizing shared -use paved trails, cycletracks or bike ways provide users with greater safety and comfort that will yield the highest usage. Lastly, local traffic regulations should be reviewed and updated to ensure that vulnerable road users like bicyclist's are protected. Develop and adopt a Vison Zero plan and become a Vision Zero community. Enhance unsignalized and mid -block crosswalks using proven in- terventions such as Rectangular Rapid Flashing Beacons (RRFB's), curb extensions and raised crossings. Lower the speed of automobile traffic where vulnerable road users are present through enforcement of safer speed limits and traffic calming measures. Implement Road Diets on streets identified as candidates in the City's Mobility Plan. Provide grade separated or controlled crossings, such as HAWKS, for people walking and on bikes crossing multi -lane arterial roads. 77 El e Fa YETTE 1 The 2003 Fayetteville Alternative Trails and Transportation plan succeeded in spurring the development of the City's ever-expanding trail network over the last decade. This Active Transportation Plan builds upon past success and reaffirms the City's commitment to planning for the future of active transportation. This plan sets a path forward by identifying a progressive yet achievable vision, developing a set of realistic goals and through the implementation of important action steps. By combining pedestrian and bicycle planning into active trans- portation planning we recognize that a comprehensive approach will yield the maximum return on the public's investment. Many of the action steps in this plan are similar to steps taken in other prominent bicycle and pedestrian friendly communities. The imple- mentation process is designed to be ongoing and dynamic with progress made through constant innovation and adaption. Success will be measured through identified metrics collected over time. Ultimately, this plan provides Fayetteville with the framework for building an active transportation network that will lead to a more healthy and vibrant community. <,r 77-I;rt � CITY OF FAYETTEVILLE ARKANSAS CITY OF FAYETTEVILLE'S ACTIVE TRANSPORTATION PLAN Originally created: 2014 Updated: 2022 Created by: The City of Fayetteville Staff Dane Eifling Mobility Coordinator 479-575-8243 deifling@fayetteville-ar.gov Matt Mihalevich Active Transportation Manager 479-444-3416 mmihalevich@fayetteville-ar.gov IVA CITY OF FAYETTEVILLE ARKANSAS TRAFFIC CALMING POLICY EFFECTIVE MARCH 17, 2021 INTRODUCTION Excessive traffic speeds in neighborhood areas is an issue of concern to citizens in Fayetteville. This policy addresses a procedure through which neighborhoods can be considered for traffic calming measures. Traffic calming is the management of traffic through the use of roadway design features. Traffic management through traffic calming is most effective if the features are both warranted and properly designed. Traffic calming solutions may be warranted where there is a demonstrated need for traffic calming, and where solutions can be identified that may address the need. Not only must the needs be perceived by the neighborhood, but they must also be documented to be substantive. In order for traffic calming strategies to be effective, traffic data collection and analysis must validate that calming needs are legitimate. These traffic studies may include: 1. Speed studies 2. Vehicle and pedestrian counts 3. Through -traffic surveys 4. Accident records Effective solutions for valid needs also require that the selected traffic calming strategy be appropriate for the need. Once an effective strategy for traffic calming has been selected, it should be properly designed in accordance with the relevant design parameters. These should include consideration of: 1. Traffic volume 2. Design speed 3. Design vehicle characteristics 4. Emergency services Although warranted and properly designed traffic calming strategies can have the desired benefits of managing traffic, they also can create disadvantages to adjacent streets and neighborhoods and to the traveling public at large. Traffic calming can have the potential of shifting an existing traffic problem to another street or neighborhood. Traffic calming may also increase delay for emergency response vehicles and can increase long term maintenance costs for the City. Because of the controversy and potential disadvantages, traffic calming should be implemented only with the majority consent of those directly impacted. This policy therefore provides guidelines for the following traffic calming activities: 1. Requests for traffic calming consideration 2. Prioritization of requests 3. Identification and approval of traffic calming strategies 4. Programming of traffic calming improvements 5. Design of traffic calming projects 6. Evaluation of traffic calming projects REQUESTS FOR TRAFFIC CALMING CONSIDERATION Requests for traffic calming received will be catalogued, and will be assigned to one of three tiers: Tier 1: Proximity to Schools (1/2-mile walkshed) or other significant points of interest Tier 2: Obvious cut -through opportunities (based on engineering best judgement, could be supplemented with traffic count study) Tier 3: Dead-end or disconnected areas of the transportation network If a citizen requests police patrol enforcement, the request will be forwarded to the Police Department for possible enforcement action. Requests from multiple streets may be grouped together and/or staff may add streets that may be impacted by traffic calming to requests. If such grouping occurs, the requirements of the next section will apply to the grouped streets. PRIORITIZATION OF TRAFFIC CALMING REQUESTS Locations assigned to Tier 1 or Tier 2 will be scheduled for further study upon receipt by the City Engineer of a petition or other affirmative response by at least one member of seventy percent (70%) of the property ownerships facing the street(s) on which the traffic calming study is requested. A block shall consist of every developed property having frontage on the street to be studied between successive intersecting streets. A typical traffic calming petition shall include, at a minimum, a description of the street or streets which are to be included in the calming study and the signature or other written evidence of approval of at least 70% of the property owners on those street(s). Where more than one person is listed as owner for each property, only one person shall be entitled to vote or sign a petition. Likewise, if multiple properties are owned by the same person or persons, the owner(s) will only be entitled to one vote or signature on the petition. This definition of property owner shall apply throughout this policy document. The City staff assigned to administer traffic calming studies will review the request for validity and will assess whether other streets may be impacted by implementation of traffic calming strategies. City staff will define the area of potential impact resulting from the traffic calming implementation on a case by case basis. Relevant data to be collected for the study includes: 1. Speed and volume counts 2. Accident experience 3. Distance to schools and other pedestrian generators 4. Pedestrian facilities This data will be used to assign a point value to each Tier 1 and Tier 2 location, as follows: Speed Per 5pts for each MPH > 5MPH above 25 mph, or the Calc. posted speed if above 25 mph Volume Per ADT/100 Sidewalks 0-5 5pts if no continuous sidewalk, 2.5pts if one side Accidents 0-5 1 pt for each accident/year at one location School 10pts within quarter -mile radius, 7.5pts if between Walkshed 0-10 quarter- and half -mile radius, 5pts within half -mile radius, 2.5pts if partially in half -mile radius Locations receiving a minimum of 35 points, or that have 85t" percentile speeds above 35 mph will receive further consideration for traffic calming under this program. Locations with 85tn percentile speeds not exceeding 5 mph over the speed limit or below 25 mph will not receive further consideration regardless of score. Streets that do not meet these minimum criteria, and dead-end or disconnected streets that are placed in Tier 3 generally will not be considered for structural traffic calming, but may be considered for enforcement and are eligible for consideration of tactical urbanism permits. IDENTIFICATION OF TRAFFIC CALMING STRATEGIES City staff shall present to the residents living within the area of potential impact the results of the traffic calming study and rating. Where traffic calming may be appropriate, staff will present options for traffic calming in the affected area. Sixty percent (60%) or more of the property owners in the area of potential impact must support the proposed strategy option(s) before the City will give further consideration to traffic calming implementation. In certain circumstances, the 60% requirement may be waived. These circumstances may include locations that have disinterested owners (e.g. locations with a large percentage of rental properties or locations adjacent to a single multifamily apartment complex) or other situations that are deemed necessary for public safety by the City. PROGRAMMING OF TRAFFIC CALMING IMPROVEMENTS Periodically, but not less than once each year, City staff will prioritize those traffic calming strategies within the City that have been approved within their area of impact. Prioritization will be based on the rating system. The City Council Transportation Committee will approve projects to be implemented, up to the yearly budget as determined by City Council. Those traffic calming improvement locations not selected, will remain in consideration for up to three years. City ward boundaries should be considered so that projects affecting each ward can be implemented. DESIGN OF TRAFFIC CALMING PROJECTS The design of traffic calming devices must meet the following criteria: 1. Only residential links or urban center streets are eligible. 2. The street shall have an ADT of less than 4,000. 3. Limited to streets having only one lane of through traffic in each direction. 4. Streets must not be primary emergency routes, as determine by the Police and Fire Departments. 5. At the discretion of the City Engineer, certain traffic calming measures may not be used if they would create an unsafe condition for motorists driving at normal speeds under average driving conditions. 6. Streets must not be through truck routes unless an acceptable alternative route is identified and approved. Design of traffic calming features shall accommodate a single unit truck. EVALUATION OF TRAFFIC CALMING PROJECTS Six months following the completion of the traffic calming improvements, City staff may undertake a follow-up study to determine if the traffic calming features have achieved the initial purpose of the project. If unacceptable impacts are identified, corrective measures may be taken. Traffic calming measures may be removed after the evaluation period for any of the following reasons: 1. Emergency response is significantly impacted. 2. The problem for which the traffic calming was implemented has been transferred to another street. 3. At least sixty percent (60%) of the property owners in the defined area of impact sign a petition to remove the traffic calming measures. This option will result in complete removal of all measures. Where traffic calming measures are removed by petition, a period of at least 3 years must pass before future petitions for traffic calming measures will be considered on the same street(s).