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2022-02-22 - Agendas - FinalCITY OF FAYETTEVILLE %PF ARKANSAS MEETING AGENDA Water, Sewer, and Solid Waste Committee 22 February 2022 5:30 P.M. (Or immediately following City Council Agenda Session) This is a Virtual Meeting Committee: Council Member Teresa Turk, Council Member Sloan Scroggin, Council Member D'Andre Jones, Council Member Mike Wiederkehr Copy to: Mayor Lioneld Jordan, Paul Becker, Kara Paxton, Susan Norton, Chris Brown, Alan Pugh, Terry Gulley, Peter Nierengarten, Jeff Coles, Brian Pugh, Andrea Foren, Mark Rogers, Corey Granderson, Aaron Watkins, Greg Weeks, Monty Sedlak From: Tim Nyander, Utilities Director CALL TO ORDER ROLL CALL UPDATES OLD BUSINESS: NEW BUSINESS: 1. Introduction of Committee Member Mike Wiederkehr Utilities Director Tim Nyander will give a brief overview of the jurisdiction and responsibilities of the Utilities Department. 2. Damage Claim at Makeig Court Due to Water Leak The Utilities Department has received two claims in an amount that is above the threshold contained in the Water and Wastewater Damage Claim Ordinance. City staff will provide further detail. STAFF REQUESTS THIS BE FORWARDED TO THE CITY COUNCIL FOR CONSIDERATION FOR APPROVAL 1 3. Bid Results on Markham Hill Water Tank Refurbishment The sealed competitive bids were opened today on refurbishing the Markham Hill Water Storage Tank. While the successful bid has not been certified by the Purchasing Department, we are confident which company is the lowest and best bid. Utilities Engineer Corey Granderson will discuss the project. We would request that the committee consider forwarding this item to the City Council, contingent on the winning bid being certified. STAFF REQUESTS THIS BE FORWARDED TO THE CITY COUNCIL FOR CONSIDERATION FOR APPROVAL 4. Hill Avenue Cost Share Proposal During the development of multifamily housing on Hill Street between W. Stone Street and MLK Jr. Blvd., it was noted that a fire hydrant would be needed to conform to code. The City's GIS indicated that there was a 6-inch water line available to install the needed fire hydrant. When the line was exposed in preparation for a tapping connection, it was discovered that the water line was a 4-inch pipe. The City will not permit a fire hydrant to be connected to a 4-inch line, as the volume of water a hydrant can flow would damage the undersized pipe. The engineer representing the project has requested that the City consider participating in a cost -share for installation of a 6-inch water line. The line would connect at Stone street and extend through the project boundary where a fire hydrant would be placed to meet fire code for the development. This infill project razed two homes to create 15-units and the proposed hydrant will improve fire protection for other residents on the street. A 50/50 cost split is proposed to share the cost of bringing the upsized waterline to the project site. The city will pay 100% of the cost to tie -over existing customer service lines in the area so that the existing 4-inch line can be abandoned, avoiding parallel waterlines in this street. The final percentage will be based on contractor cost estimates and presented at the March Water, Sewer and Solid Waste Committee meeting. INFORMATION ONLY 5. Overview of WWTP Monthly Report Discussion of December's Monthly WWTP Report PRESENTATIONS December WWTP Report ATTACHMENTS December WWTP Report ADJOURN Next Water, Sewer, Solid Waste Committee meets on Tuesday, March 8, 2022, at 5:30 p.m. .;acobs Fayetteville Client Monthly Report for December 2021 January 20, 2022 City of Fayetteville CITY OF WA FAYETTEVILLE ARKANSAS West Side Water Resource Recovery Facility Jacobs Fayetteville Client Monthly Report for December 2021 Jacobs Contents ExecutiveSummary..................................................................................................................................................ii 1. Plant Operations.........................................................................................................................................4 1.1 Process Control...........................................................................................................................................................4 1.2 Biosolids Process........................................................................................................................................................4 1.3 Compliance..................................................................................................................................................................4 1.4 Successes...................................................................................................................................................................... 5 1.5 Issues/Resolutions.................................................................................................................................................... 5 1.6 Revenue.........................................................................................................................................................................8 Table 1-1: Revenue generated from the BMS............................................................................................................... 8 Figure 1-1: Revenue generated from the BMS via hay, fertilizer, and WTR.......................................................8 2. Maintenance................................................................................................................................................9 2.1 West Side....................................................................................................................................................................... 9 2.2 Noland............................................................................................................................................................................9 2.3 Lift Stations............................................................................................................................................................... 10 2.4 BMS Maintenance................................................................................................................................................... 10 2.5 Key Performance Indicators/Measures.......................................................................................................... 11 Figure 2-1: Labor Hours by Work Order Type............................................................................................................. 11 Figure2-2: Work Order Count by Type.......................................................................................................................... 11 2.6 Capital Improvement Projects(CIP)................................................................................................................ 12 3. Laboratory/Industrial Pretreatment...................................................................................................13 Table 3-1: Revenue generated from the Industrial Pretreatment Program(IPP)........................................ 14 Figure 3-1: IPP revenue total from surcharges, fees, and fines........................................................................... 14 Figure 3-2: Loads of hauled waste -by hauler and cumulative loads per month .......................................... 14 4. Woolsey Wet Prairie................................................................................................................................15 5. Community Outreach.............................................................................................................................16 6. Sustainability............................................................................................................................................17 7. Health & Safety/Training.......................................................................................................................18 Appendix A. Additional Information.................................................................................................................19 A.1 Effluent & Influent Data....................................................................................................................................... 19 A.2 White River Effluent Characteristics................................................................................................................ 19 Jacobs — Fayetteville Project Jacobs Fayetteville Client Monthly Report for December 2021 Jacobs Executive Summary Project year 2021 realized many challenges. We had several major equipment failures that were demanding on both personnel and budget. Initially we were faced with issues on the emergency standby generator and then we were met with extreme complications in the biosolids dryer. The dryer was a double hit consisting of repair costs and landfill tip fees. The dryer had several maintenance issues, finishing with catastrophic component failure. We worked to provide fiscal accountability amidst these unexpected events. Our process was to calculate all encumbered funds and remove them from the ledger through our forecasting tool. We were expecting an overage from the unplanned repairs and landfill costs. However, we also had some unplanned fiscal benefits. Our forecasting tool counted obligations outstanding. We did not take delivery of every obligation before December 31, 2021. Some of the financial obligations are still pending due to delivery delays and will be paid for in the 2022 budget year. Our current projection places us approximately $5,000 under budget for 2021. After the reconciliation of pending residual invoices, we will have a final number. In summary, we are pleased to provide a positive fiscal end of year report, despite these unplanned equipment failures and tangential costs. Budget Performance $71,981 $58,102$60,101 $44,573 $32,123 $16,797 $7,957 $(5,074) � o P p49 $(27,204) � $(113,194) ■ Labor ■ Non -Labor ■ Budget - Over (Under) Jacobs — Fayetteville Project Jacobs Fayetteville Client Monthly Report for December 2021 Jacobs Labor Non -Labor Budget - Over (Under) March $ 10,470 $ (123,664) $ (113,194) April $ 35,404 $ (62,608) $ (27,204) May $ 36,558 $ (19,761) $ 16,797 June $ 37,208 $ 7,365 $ 44,573 July $ 20,719 $ (12,762) $ 7,957 August $ 25,275 $ 6,848 $ 32,123 September $ 24,910 $ 33,192 $ 58,102 October $ 13,262 $ 46,839 $ 60,101 November $ (20,233) $ 92,214 $ 71,981 December $ (26,049) $ 20,975 $ (5,074) Jacobs — Fayetteville Project Jacobs Fayetteville Client Monthly Report for December 2021 Jacobs 1. Plant Operations The Noland and West Side Water Resource Recovery Facilities (WRRF's) effluent discharges were 100% in compliance with the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit. Details of effluent quality and influent loadings are shown in Appendix A. 1.1 Process Control Noland The West Aeration Basin was taken offline to complete repairs on aerators and replace anaerobic mixers. Keeping unnecessary equipment out of service during the winter season also allows lower electrical costs and reduced wear on additional equipment. A brief interruption in nitrification was experienced until the MLSS (Mixed Liquor Suspended Solids) target concentration was achieved. The facility continued to maintain treatment well below permit limits during this time. The Noland WRRF experienced high flow conditions brought on by a total of 3.16 inches of rainfall within 24 hours on the 17th. Total influent flow peaked at 28 million gallons, making it the highest influent flows experienced in 2021. West Side During the month of December, the West Side WRRF experienced a total of 6.50 inches of rain. Elevated influent flows peaked at 39.7 million gallons on the 17th. All excess flow at both facilities was treated within compliance of the NPDES permits. 1.2 Biosolids Process During the month of December, the WRRF's produced 2,166 wet tons of biosolids with approximately 696 wet tons processed directly through the thermal dryer and 1,470 wet tons of biosolids applied into the solar houses. A total of 937 tons of belt filter pressed, partially dried biosolids were transferred to area landfills due to dryer downtime. Approximately 533 tons of water weight was removed prior to landfill disposal. Total landfill costs were $45,166.57. 1.3 Compliance An estimated 50 gallons of heat transfer fluid flowed from the thermal dryer building after the dryer incident outlined below. The fluid pooled in a nearby ditch and the contaminated soil was removed and properly classified for disposal at the landfill. The team also contacted a local remediation group the night of the explosion to ensure no additional fluid reached the stormwater collection area. The remediation group was able to extract approximately 110 gallons of heat transfer fluid from the floor inside the building. Compliance experts were informed about the issue and their advice was put into action immediately. A compliance report was prepared and sent to ADEQ detailing the spill and disposal. Jacobs — Fayetteville Project Jacobs Fayetteville Client Monthly Report for December 2021 Jacobs Heat Transfer Fluid Remediation 1.4 Successes Due to unforeseen thermal dryer circumstances, the need for additional CDL drivers arose. After significant difficulty in locating experienced drivers, it was decided that current team members will be trained. Two staff members have already passed their written test and have been permitted to start driver training. When all CDL requirements have been completed, these staff members will support the current CDL drivers to reduce overtime pay. 1.5 Issues/Resolutions On December 13, the thermal dryer floating bearing experienced a condition defined as BLEVE, or Boiling Liquid Expanding Vapor Explosion. The cause of this event is still unknown. The new thermal temperature sensors did not register an abnormality until the point of combustion. Therefore, the sensors that were programmed to shut equipment down when temperature setpoints were exceeded, never received the signal to power down equipment until after the explosion. Jacobs — Fayetteville Project Jacobs Fayetteville Client Monthly Report for December 2021 Jacobs As a result of the explosion, the thermal dryer and thermal dryer building were damaged extensively. The entire floating bearing was destroyed and the 1-inch steel brace above and below the bearing was warped due to forces from the explosion. The force also propelled shrapnel through the thermal building wall and the fire after the event damaged the roof and rolling doors on the west side of the building. Jacobs — Fayetteville Project Jacobs Fayetteville Client Monthly Report for December 2021 The yellow line drawn in the photographs shows the warping of the thermal dryer brace I; BONN IWOM& a I.. � - Thermal Dryer event results in extensive destruction to building ,jacobs Jacobs — Fayetteville Project Jacobs Fayetteville Client Monthly Report for December 2021 1.6 Revenue Table 1-1: Revenue generated from the BMS ,jacobs Product Tons Sold/Received Revenue Generated Hay 43.39 $3,456.20 Fertilizer 109.58 $2,191.60 Water Treatment Residuals 131.31 $4,189.84 Figure 1-1: Revenue generated from the BMS via hay, fertilizer, and WTR Revenue Generated Biosolids Management Site $180,000 $160,000 $140,000 $120,000 - $100,000 $80,000 $60,000 $40,000 $20,000 n m RI m �I e� 4a�r J e��et O��� QQ �J Qp O F P heQ` �o �e O Monthly 2020 O Monthly 2021 Cumulative 2021 Jacobs - Fayetteville Project 8 Jacobs Fayetteville Client Monthly Report for December 2021 Jacobs 2. Maintenance 2.1 West Side New cameras were installed to record a better angle on the biosolids production steps of the belt filter presses. The cameras also provide a better view of the truck loading process. 2.2 Noland A leak was discovered in RAS pump 4 and was repaired with a new mechanical seal before being returned to service. A new mechanical seal is installed on RAS pump 4 Jacobs — Fayetteville Project Jacobs Fayetteville Client Monthly Report for December 2021 Jacobs An additional sludge feed pump drive was replaced after it began to malfunction. Biosolids sludge feed pump receives a new drive 2.3 Lift Stations Routine lift station maintenance and grounds upkeep continued through December. 2.4 BMS Maintenance As a winter stewardship project, the BMS staff began repairing the fence along Wyman Road. Brush and barbed wire were removed from the fence line and new wire was installed. Jacobs — Fayetteville Project 10 Jacobs Fayetteville Client Monthly Report for December 2021 ,jacobs 2.5 Key Performance Indicators/Measures Figure 2-1: Labor Hours by Work Order Type ❑ 0.00, 0% 159.^� ""• 589.98, 34% ❑ 64.60, 4% ❑ administrative ❑ corrective maintenance emergency corrective maintenance non emergency corrective maintenance from pm/pdm preventive maintenance project ❑ safety ❑ 104.26, 6% ❑ administrative ❑ corrective maintenance emergency corrective maintenance non emergency ❑ corrective maintenance from pm/pdm ❑ 763.31, 45")preventive maintenance Figure 2-2: Work Order Count by Type 2, 0% ❑ 0, 0% 11 project ❑ safety ❑ 29, 2% ❑ 5, 0% 113, 6% 18. 1% Jacobs — Fayetteville Project 11 Jacobs Fayetteville Client Monthly Report for December 2021 Jacobs 2.6 Capital Improvement Projects (CIP) A rebuild of Hamestring Lift Station pump no. 3 was added as a break-in project. This break-in project was presented as a non -agenda item at the December Water & Sewer Committee meeting. A total of 10 capital improvement projects were completed in 2021 including 7 encumbered projects from 2020. All remaining approved 2021 projects will be moved to the 2022 agenda. Jacobs — Fayetteville Project 12 Jacobs Fayetteville Client Monthly Report for December 2021 Jacobs 3. Laboratory/Industrial Pretreatment Quarterly 40 CFR 122 Appendix D Table 111 samples were collected at both facilities for the analysis of cyanide, phenolics, and metals (antimony, arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, copper, Lead, low level mercury, nickel, selenium, silver, thallium, and zinc). Samples were collected from the Noland influent, White River effluent, West Side influent, and Goose Creek effluent and sent to GTS for analysis. Data results were statistically within scope and exhibited no unusual trends. The results are reported annually to ADEQ by the Industrial Pretreatment department. Arsenic results are reported quarterly to ADEQ as required by the newest Noland permit. Soil samples collected from Areas 5 and 6 were sent to Geotechnical & Testing Services (GTS) for the following analyses: pH, electrical conductivity, cation -exchange capacity, total solids, sodium absorption ratio (SAR), nitrate nitrogen, phosphorus, and metals (cadmium, copper, lead, nickel, zinc, potassium, arsenic, mercury, molybdenum, selenium, aluminum, and iron). The SAR data is a measure of the ability of the soil to allow proper water drainage and root growth. An SAR below 13 indicates a well aerated soil. Results were all statistically within scope and exhibited no unusual trends. All BMS soil sampling is complete for 2021. Jar testing was completed on a Tidal Clear chitosan product to evaluate floc. The product failed to produce positive results. West Side Goose Creek samples were collected to complete a Whole Effluent Toxicity Screening test as outlined in the Toxicity Reduction Evaluation Plan. The test passed, showing no toxicity for survival or growth to the fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas. All permitted industries had shutdowns of various extents due to the Christmas and New Year's Eve holidays. Compliance sampling and an annual inspection was completed for Elkhart Products. They were found in compliance with their industrial discharge permit, the City of Fayetteville Code, and 40 CFR 468.14. Ecotech Consumer Products became the most recent categorical industrial user in Fayetteville under the plastics molding and forming sub -category for new users (§463.26). This industry is required to self -monitor for metals and cyanide monthly, with a weekly requirement for total suspended solids. Once full production equipment is installed in the coming months, discharge is estimated at 7,000 gallons per day. Elkhart Products and Hiland Dairy were requested to perform calibration and maintenance on effluent flow meters to ensure compliance with discharge permits. If calibration is found to be deficient, the permittees may purchase a suitable flow meter. Safe laboratory chemical waste disposal practices at Noland and West Side were recertified with Heritage Environmental. Monthly surcharge and waste hauler reports were completed and sent to the City for billing. For revenue generated from the IPP, see Table 3-1 and Figure 3-1. Jacobs — Fayetteville Project Jacobs Fayetteville Client Monthly Report for December 2021 ,jacobs Table 3-1: Revenue generated from the Industrial Pretreatment Program (IPP) Revenue $131,803.03 Surcharges on November data $2,000.00 Fees from hauled waste accepted in December $0.00 Other fees paid in December $0.00 Fines assessed in December Zero violations for all industrial users Violations on November data Figure 3-1: IPP revenue total from surcharges, fees, and fines Revenue Generated Industrial Pretreatment Program $150,000 $100,000 $50,000 III Cp- ❑ 2020 Monthly Surcharge Fees plus Hauled Waste Fees ❑ 2021 Monthly Surcharge Fees plus Hauled Waste Fees Figure 3-2: Loads of hauled waste -by hauler and cumulative loads per month Hauled Waste Summary 60 50 40 r 30 20 10 n 0 n n II fl I I flll Ih n1l III n1l rh flll II 1'.11 1!, n1l �Qt O°�9 gel °�e� � sec O ❑ 2020 Arkansas Portable Toilets ❑ 2020 Best Jet 2020 White River Enviro. Services 2020 TOTAL 2021 Arkansas Portable Toilets ❑ 2021 Best Jet ❑ 2021 White River Enviro. Services ❑ 2021 TOTAL Jacobs — Fayetteville Project Jacobs Fayetteville Client Monthly Report for December 2021 Jacobs 4. Woolsey Wet Prairie Looking back over 2021 records, precipitation totals were just slightly lower than normal with an estimated 45 inches, compared to a regional normal of 48.5 inches. This provided the conditions for Woolsey's wetland cells to experience the desirable wet -prairie cycle of retaining standing surface water through the winter, spring, and early summer while drying up during the late summer and into the early fall period of August to November. Following an especially dry August and September nearly all surface water had dried up, even from the remnant farm ponds, which rarely occurs. Limited periods of completely dry conditions are desirable for promoting some of Woolsey's most rare wet - prairie ecology, namely the Crayfish frog which thrives in habitats with temporal water sources. A final, year-end management activity will involve pulling all stop logs in early January to minimize water retention heading into the new year and the prescribed burn season. Year 2021 Woolsey Wet -Prairie Annual Surface Water Monitoring Table Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec ANN Precip. ACT NRM DIFF 30 28 03 08 2830 36 60 0.3 59 db ]A 50 60 I 3J 501.3 50 35 f.5 15 a21.) 20 6829 18 03 3.5 16 <�26 5.3 32 1 2.0 <50 G85 -3,5 Surface H2O x x x x x x x - - - - x 8 of 12 E5 WOF Ret. - - - - - - - - - - - - 0 of 12 12- Log Combo 5: 7: 0: 0: 0: 0: ! 7: 7: 7: 7: I 7:5 I 0: — Height (in.) 5 ! 7 0 ! 0 0 0 I 7 7 ! 7 I 7 I 0 i 0 Pond Ret. x x x x x x ! x x I x 1 x x I x ! 12 of 12 E4 S. H2O x x x x !` - ! - !1 - j - i x i 8 of 12 WOF Ret. X X - X - X f - - - I - i - i - 4 of 12 19- L.C. I 5: 7: 7:5 I 7:5 I 7:5 7: I 0: 0: 0: I 0: I 0: I 7: H. (in.) f 5 7 12 12 12 7 0 0 0 I 0 ! 0 5 S. H2O x x x i x x x - - - - - x 7 of 12 E3 WOF Ret. X - - I X X 3 of 12 21• L.C. 5: 0: 7:5:5 I 7:5:5 7:5:5 7:S:5 7:5:S 7:5:5 5:5 5:5 S:5 5: H. (in.) 5 0 17 I 17 17 17 17 17 10 10 10 S S. H2O x x x x x x x - - - - x 8 of 12 UE1 WOF Re,. X X - X - X - - - - - X 5 of 12 -c 21- L.C. I 5: 7: 7:7 i 7:7 7:7 7:7 7:7 7:7 7:5 7:5 7:5 ` 7: 5 7 14 I 14 14 14 14 1 14 12 12 12 I 7 N S. H2O x x x x x x x - - - - x 8 of 12 E2 WOF Ret. X X X I X I - X I - - - - - X 1 6 of 12 5: ! 7: 7:5:5 ! 7:7 7:7 7:7 ! 7:7 7:7 7:7 7:7 7:7 I 7: ! 5 7 17 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 7 S. H2O x x x x x x x - - - - x 7 of 12 WI WOF Ret. X X - X - X - - - - - X 4 of 12 12- L.C. S: 7: 7:7 7:S 7:5 7:5 7:5 7:S 7:5 7:5 7:5 7: H. (in.) 5 7 14 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 7 Pond Ret. x x x x x x x x x x x x 12 of 12 S. H2O x x x x x x x - - - - x ! 8 of 12 W2 Max Ret. X X X X X X I - - - - I - X 7 of 12 L.C. 1 NA i NA i NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA H. (in.) j NA ! NA I NA NA NA I NA I NA NA NA NA NA I NA JACOBS Jacobs — Fayetteville Project 15 Jacobs Fayetteville Client Monthly Report for December 2021 5. Community Outreach ,jacobs The Washington County Search and Rescue K9 team utilized the BMS site for training. The Jacobs team collected gifts for a Toys for Tots event. CHRISTMAS Gift Collection to benefit Tcys for Tots Jacobs — Fayetteville Project 16 Jacobs Fayetteville Client Monthly Report for December 2021 Jacobs 6. Sustainability Maintenance installed new motion sensors to reduce the consumption of electricity when the Noland maintenance shop area is unoccupied. Noland Maintenance Shop Motion sensors installed to reduce unnecessary electrical consumption New LED lighting installation around the West Side operations office and biological units has improved visibility at night with no negative impact on the surrounding wetlands. This has greatly improved safety for the operators while doing nighttime equipment checks and truck changes. Jacobs — Fayetteville Project Jacobs Fayetteville Client Monthly Report for December 2021 Jacobs 7. Health & Safety/Training The facility has developed initiatives heading into the 2022 year. The safety team will consist of a chairman and four delegates. The plant will continue its focus on providing quality safety training to the staff. More than 260 safety training events were complete throughout 2021. Jacobs is committed to providing high quality safety training to its employees. The team will look for hazard elimination opportunities going forward into 2022. This process starts with looking at existing moderate to elevated level hazards. The next step is to implement the hierarchy of control matrix. The matrix includes safety controls for hazards. The lowest control in protection is PPE (personal protective equipment), while the next control is found in administrative actions. These may include staff rotation and frequent breaks. The final, and best option is engineering a solution to eliminate the hazard. This step is a primary initiative for the facility going forward. The safety team will provide training during the plantwide meeting to address this emphasis in the site safety manual. Jacobs associates attended the Northwest District AWEA meeting hosted by the City of Fayetteville. Monty Sedlak, Project Manager, presented on The Fruits of Predictive Maintenance, outlining the benefits of Artesis and other advances in technology. Jacobs' Scott Grieco, Principal Technologist, visited to present on PFAS in Our Water Cycle — Pathways and Impacts Beyond Drinking Water. Also given was a presentation by Wen Zhang reviewing the valuable study results from tracing COVID-19 in Wastewater, for which the Noland and West Side facilities contributed many samples. Jacobs — Fayetteville Project Jacobs Fayetteville - Client Monthly Report for December 2021 Appendix A. Additional Information A.1 Effluent & Influent Data A.2 White River Effluent Characteristics .;acobs 2021 Monthly WR WR WR Average CBOD CBOD TSS Flow (mg/L) (lbs/d) (mg/L) (MGD) Permit 5.5 578 5.0 Limit December WR WR WR WR WR D.O. pH TSS Phos Phos Ammonia Ammonia Avg Min (lbs/d) (mg/L) (lbs/d) (mg/L) (lbs/d) Min (s.u.) (mg/L) 525 1.00 105.0 2.4 252 7.5 6.0 pH Fecal Max Coliform (s.u.) (MPN/ loom[) 9.0 1,000 January 5.8 2.7 128 2.8 131 0.14 6.3 0.2 8 15.0 7.0 7.5 77 February 5.1 4.3 174 4.4 181 0.19 7.7 0.5 22 16.6 6.9 7.4 174 March 6.3 3.7 199 3.0 166 0.15 7.9 0.2 12 14.9 7.3 7.4 22 April 5.1 3.4 188 1.1 62 0.09 4.9 0.3 15 12.8 7.3 7.6 54 May 10.0 3.8 308 1.6 133 0.11 9.3 0.2 13 12.3 7.4 7.6 17 June 7.4 3.5 214 1.5 94 0.31 17.8 0.1 6 12.3 7.2 7.5 35 July 5.1 3.3 136 2.1 85 0.37 15.4 0.2 8 13.1 7.2 7.8 74 August 4.4 3.3 113 1.1 41 0.42 14.7 0.3 12 15.5 7.1 7.7 73 September 4.2 2.7 90 1.3 45 0.24 8.3 0.1 4 17.6 7.1 7.5 110 October 5.0 2.8 103 1.8 68 0.26 10.0 0.1 4 18.2 7.4 7.5 198 November 5.7 4.0 199 4.0 200 0.27 13.7 0.1 4 16.4 7.4 7.7 244 December 5.7 3.0 134 2.2 95 0.14 6.5 1.2 29 18.3 7.4 7.7 49 Average 5.8 3.4 166 2.2 108 0.22 10.2 0.3 11 15.2 7.2 7.6 94 White River Effluent Characteristics- Minerals 2021 WR WR WR TDS TDS Sulfate (mg/L) (lbs/d) (mg/L) Permit 500 52,542 119 Limit December WR WR WR Sulfate Nitrate Nitrate (lbs/d) (mg/L) (lbs/d) 12,505 report report January 342 15,871 62 3,154 4 204 February 351 14,818 67 3,392 5 253 March 347 18,845 72 3,741 6 291 April 335 18,124 72 3,609 3 135 May 320 26,059 56 3,167 4 221 June 338 20,861 50 4,391 6 483 July 347 15,391 61 2,478 7 292 August 400 14,214 66 2,064 10 310 September 378 12,889 47 1,740 12 444 October 380 13,820 55 1,738 10 316 November 375 18,470 53 2,794 11 580 December 357 16,352 68 2,013 5 154 Average 356 17,143 61 2,857 7 307 Jacobs - Fayetteville Project 19 MI Jacobs Fayetteville - Client Monthly Report for December 2021 oaco S Goose Creek Effluent Characteristics 2021 Monthly Average Flow (MGD) GC CBOD (mg/L) GC CBOD (Lbs/d) GC TSS (mg/L) GC TSS (lbs/d) GC Phos (mg/L) GC Phos (lbs/d) GC Ammonia (mg/L) GC Ammonia (lbs/d) D.O. Avg Min (mg/L) pH Min (s.u.) pH Max (s.u.) Fecal Coliform (MPN/100ml) Permit Limit December 6.6 550.4 10.0 834 1.00 83.4 2.3 191.8 7.5 6.0 9.0 1,000 January 10.8 2.0 174.3 1.1 95 0.08 7.2 0.2 18.4 10.7 7.0 7.4 8 February 9.7 2.0 161.9 1.0 81 0.08 6.4 0.1 8.1 11.1 7.0 7.4 5 March 11.8 2.1 202.0 1.0 101 0.13 12.8 0.1 13.3 10.4 7.1 7.5 7 April 12.1 2.0 202.1 1.0 101 0.08 7.6 0.1 13.5 9.9 7.2 7.5 6 May 14.2 2.0 236.1 1.0 118 0.06 7.2 0.1 13.6 9.7 7.3 7.5 5 June 10.9 2.0 188.4 1.0 94 0.06 5.9 j 0.11 10.2 9.3 7.1 7.6 6 July 9.1 2.4 177.9 1.0 75 0.22 19.9 0.2 19 9.0 7.3 7.7 10 August 7.4 2.1 129 1.0 62 0.06 3.9 0.1 9 8.7 7.5 7.7 6 September 7.0 1.9 113.7 1.0 59 0.05 3.1 0.1 7.8 8.8 7.4 7.6 6 October 8.9 2.0 149.4 1.0 75 0.06 4.6 0.28 25.5 9.2 7.2 7.6 9 November 8.0 2.4 162.7 1.0 69 0.06 3.8 0.03 1.7 9.9 7.4 7.6 5 December 9.0 2.1 138.6 1.0 68 0.06 4.3 0.0 2.4 10.1 7.3 7.5 5 Average 9.9 2.1 169.7 1.0 83 0.08 7.2 0.1 11.8 9.7 7.2 7.5 6 Paul R. Noland Influent Characteristics Noland I Monthly Hydraulic WRRF Average Loadings Flow Percent of (MGD) Design Designed 12.6 (Annual Avg.) BOD Organic TSS TSS Loading Loading Loading Loading (Lbs/d) Percent (lbs/d) Percent of of Design Design 29,666 23,198 PO4 PO4 NH3 NH3 Loading Loading Loading Loading (lbs/d) Percent (Lbs/d) Percent of of Design Design 765 2,250 January 6.3 49.9% 16,471 55.5% 8,150 35.1% 192 25.1% 699 31.1% February 5.1 40.1% 11,850 39.9% 7,368 31.8% 175 22.9% 720 32.0% March 6.7 53.2% 14,260 48.1% 7,846 33.8% 196 25.6% 826 36.7% April 7.1 56.6% 17,335 58.4% 9,693 41.8% 209 27.3% 939 41.7% May 7.7 60.8% 15,173 51.1% 9,797 42.2% 222 29.0% 788 35.0% June 5.7 45.1% 13,062 44.0% 8,110 35.0% 176 23.0% 543 24.1% July 5.0 39.7% 13,984 47.1% 7,746 33.4% 207 27.1% 559 24.8% August 4.1 32.5% 14,698 49.5% 9,221 39.7% 187 24.4% 789 35.0% September 4.2 33.1% 16,082 54.2% 9,571 41.3% 215 28.1% 881 39.1% October 5.3 42.1% 19,869 67.0% 12,089 52.1% 232 30.3% 956 42.5% November 5.1 40.3% 17,970 60.6% 9,899 42.7% 220 28.8% 843 37.5% December 6.0 47.5% 22,432 75.6% 13,615 58.7% 222 29.0% 869 38.6% Average 5.7 45.1 % 16,099 54.3% 9,425 40.6% 204 26.7% 784 34.9% Jacobs - Fayetteville Project 20 I Jacobs Fayetteville - Client Monthly Report for December 2021 oaco S West Side Influent Characteristics West Side Monthly WRRF Average Flow (MGD) Hydraulic Loadings Percent of Design Boo Organic TSS TSS PO4 PO4 NH3 NH3 Loading Loading Loading Loading Loading Loading Loading Loading (lbs/d) Percent of (lbs/d) Percent (lbs/d) Percent (lbs/d) Percent Design of Design of Design of Design 14,595 14,595 584 1918 Designed (Annual Avg.) 10.0 January 10.8 107.6% 12,508 85.7% 12,331 84.5% 218 37.4% 1,605 83.7% February 9.6 95.9% 13,110 89.8% 12,291 84.2% 160 27.4% 1,406 73.3% March 11.8 118.1% 15,216 104.3% 12,918 88.5% 252 43.1% 1,850 96.4% April 12.1 121.0% 12,799 87.7% 13,164 90.2% 219 37.5% 1,917 100.0% May 14.1 141.2% 12,171 83.4% 14,193 97.2% 194 33.2% 1,448 75.5% June 10.8 108.3% 11,669 80.0% 12,705 87.0% 195 33.4% 1,760 91.8% July 9.1 91.1% 12,941 88.7% 15,103 103.5% 176 30.2% 1,443 75.2% August 7.4 74.0% 16,394 112.3% 14,720 100.9% 153 26.2% 1,612 84.0% September 7.0 69.8% 17,354 118.9% 18,155 124.4% 181 31.1% 1,626 84.8% October 8.9 89.0% 13,940 95.5% 13,892 95.2% 188 32.2% 1,696 88.4% November 8.1 80.7% 12,741 87.3% 11,814 80.9% 195 33.4% 1,509 78.7% December 8.9 89.5% 10,879 74.5% 12,982 88.9% 220 37.7% 1,293 67.4% Average 9.9 98.9% 13,477 92.3% 13,689 93.8% 196 33.6% 1,597 83.3% Jacobs - Fayetteville Project 21 7 oaco S Jacobs Fayetteville - Client Monthly Report for December 2021 Labor Status Department Job Title Employee Name Fayetteville /o FTE Admin Project Manager Monty Sedlak 95.00% Admin Assistant Project Manager Leonides Moreno 100.00% Admin - Operations Operations Manager Tim Luther 100.00% Admin Environmental Specialist Jeff Hickle 100.00% Admin Health, Safety, Compliance Professional Wes Cloud 70.00% Admin Project Coordinator Brandi Miller-DeWeese 90.00% Admin Administrative Assistant Christy Taylor 100.00% Admin Administrative Assistant Kassandra Foster 100.00% BMS BMS Supervisor Peter Burrow 100.00% BMS Lead Operator Vacant 100.00% BMS Lead Operator John Tenberge 100.00% BMS Equipment Operator Charlie Boger 100.00% BMS Equipment Operator Rick Witherspoon 100.00% BMS Equipment Operator Vacant 100.00% BMS Operator I David Dajani 100.00% BMS Operator In Training Ben Shondelmyer 100.00% BMS Operator In Training Vacant 100.00% BMS Operator In Training Robert Donnell 100.00% BMS Operator In Training Matthew Goud 100.00% BMS Mechanic Mike Reed 100.00% Admin Admin-Ops Supervisor Thom Vinson 90.00% LAB Laboratory Director Donna McChristian 90.00% LAB Industrial Pretreatment Coordinator John Byrd 100.00% LAB Lead Laboratory Analyst Matt Benton 60.00% LAB Laboratory Analyst Walter Choder 100.00% Maint Maintenance Supervisor Joshua Apeman 100.00% Maint Lead Mechanic Brian Daniels 95.00% Maint Lead Electrician Tim Marr 70.00% Maint Mechanic Robert Ingram 100.00% Maint Mechanic Buddy Carter 100.00% Maint Mechanic Steve Cook 100.00% Maint Mechanic Michael Spohn 100.00% Maint Mechanic Rick Dollarhide 100.00% Maint Mechanic in Training Luke Haegele 100.00% Maint Mechanic in Training Nathan Eastwood 100.00% Operations Operations Supervisor Austin Ramsfield 100.00% Operations Operator II Shawn Santellanes 100.00% Operations Operator I Anthony Ramsfield 100.00% Operations Operator I Travis Patton 100.00% Operations Operator Justin Sweeney 100.00% Operations Operator In Training Tom Meunier 100.00% Operations Operator In Training Paul Goolsby 100.00% Operations Operator In Training Chandler Smothers 100.00% Operations Operator In Training Jeremy Johnson 100.00% Operations Operator In Training Brittney Doyle 100.00% SCADA SCADA Supervisor Mayo Miller 100.00% Jacobs - Fayetteville Project Jacobs Fayetteville — Client Monthly Report for December 2021 SCADA SCADA Instrument & Control Tech Instrument & Control Tech .;acobs Pat Cooley 95.00% Mark Gleber 100.00% Authorized Positions = 48.0 Filled Positions = 45.0 Filled FTE's= 43.6 TEMPS BMS Engineering Intern, U of A Vacant 100.00% Admin Engineering Intern, U of A Sarah Garrison 100.00% Maint Engineering Intern, U of A Vacant 100.00% SPECIAL PROJECTS (Performed in scope) Area Reason Name Hours SCADA Maintenance Maintenance Network Upgrade Campos, Edgar 13.5 Asset Manager Support Bass, Edward Lee 0 Asset Manager Support Turley, Johnny D (JD) 66 Jacobs — Fayetteville Project 23