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2021-05-17 - Agendas - FinalCITY OF FAYETTEVILLE MEETING AGENDA ARKANSAS Fayetteville City Board of Health 5/17/2021 4:30 p.m. Virtual Meeting Members: Hershey Garner, Lenny Whiteman, Huda Sharaf, Gary Berner, Stephanie Ho Ex-Officio Members: Meredith Lowry, Richard Taffner, Lance Reed, Lioneld Jordan, Brad Hardin Health Officer: Marti Sharkey Guest: Kit Williams, Stephen Boss 1. Call to Order and Roll Call — Hershey Garner, Chair (5 minutes) 2. Discuss the CDC's new recommendations for mask 3. Other Business Adjourn Meeting Location Information: Virtual: Register in advance for this webinar: https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN v7lweosfS3K44mc9pLvsJw Webinar ID 945 5270 7162 Mailing Address: 113 W. Mountain Street www.fayetteville-ar.gov Fayetteville, AR 72701 To: Fayetteville City Council Mayor Lioneld Jordan From: Fayetteville Board of Health Fayetteville City Health Officer RE: Fayetteville Mask Recommendations Date: May 14, 2021 The Covid vaccines have proven to be safe and effective. Several large studies which show that fully vaccinated persons are at low risk for illness, infection, and viral transmission of SARS-CoV-2. Furthermore, evidence suggests that the vaccines also provide protection against variant strains of SARS-CoV-2. Based upon scientific evidence, the Fayetteville Board of Health and the City Health Officer make the following recommendations to the City Council: 1. We strongly recommend that all citizens be vaccinated as soon as is feasible. 2. Those persons that are fully vaccinated should no longer be required to wear masks within the City of Fayetteville, with the following exceptions: in healthcare settings, on mass transit, in prisons and jails, and in homeless shelters. 3. Fully vaccinated people are those that are at least 14 days post receiving their second dose of either the Pfizer or the Moderna vaccines or 14 days post receiving the single dose Johnson and Johnson vaccine. 4. Unvaccinated and partially vaccinated persons need to wear their masks until they are fully vaccinated. This is to protect themselves and other unvaccinated and partially vaccinated persons from becoming ill with Covid-19. 5. We understand that knowing who is and is not vaccinated is not feasible. 6. We encourage mask wearing for those that still feel more comfortable doing so for whatever reason, especially those with underlying health conditions or on medications that might limit the efficacy of the vaccines. 7. We support local businesses that still require masks for all patrons recognizing that some businesses have patrons that are not yet eligible to be vaccinated. 8. We encourage our citizens to be respectful of each individual's decision to either wear a mask or not. 9. If the new cases/day in Washington County are over 8 cases/day on a 14 day rolling average, we recommend all citizens wear a mask in public indoor venues. 10. All of the above is subject to change depending upon CDC guidelines and local conditions. References: Note: Preprints have not been peer -reviewed. They should not be regarded as conclusive, guide clinical practice/health-related behavior, or be reported in news media as established information. 1. Honein MA, Christie A, Rose DA, Brooks JT, Meaney-Delman D, Cohn A, et al. Summary of Guidance for Public Health Strategies to Address High Levels of Community Transmission of SARS-CoV-2 and Related Deaths, December 2020. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2020;69(49):1860-7. 2. Baden LR, El Sahly HM, Essink B, Kotloff K, Frey S, Novak R, et al. Efficacy and Safety of the mRNA-1273 SARS-CoV-2 Vaccine. N Engl J Med. 2021;384(5):403-16. 3. Polack FP, Thomas SJ, Kitchin N, Absalon J, Gurtman A, Lockhart S, et al. Safety and Efficacy of the BNT162b2 mRNA Covid-19 Vaccine. N Engl J Med. 2020;383(27):2603-15. 4. Pawlowski C LP, Puranik A, et. al. FDA -authorized COVID-19 vaccines are effective per real -world evidence synthesized across a multi -state health system. medRxiv. 2021;httos://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2021.02.15.21251623vl.full.pdfodf iconexternal icon. 5. Thompson MG BJ, Naleway AL, et al. Interim Estimates of Vaccine Effectiveness of BNT162b2 and mRNA- 1273 COVID-19 Vaccines in Preventing SARS-CoV-2 Infection Among Health Care Personnel, First Responders, and Other Essential and Frontline Workers - Eight U.S. Locations, December 2020-March 2021. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2021;ePub: 29 March 2021. 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