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160-07 RESOLUTIONRESOLUTION NO. 160-07 A RESOLUTION TO CREATE A CULTURAL ARTS DISTRICT AND SPECIFY ITS BORDERS BE IT RESOLVED BY THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF FAYETTEVILLE, ARKANSAS: Section 1: That the City Council of the City of Fayetteville, Arkansas hereby creates the Cultural Arts District as shown on the map attached as Exhibit A and specifies that its borders shall be as shown on the map. ``eonnrrrrrr�� o&A Y 0, PASSED and APPROVED this 4`" day of September, 2007. : FAYETTEVILLE: APPROVED: ATTEST: '%9s y'kAtA /T """"TWA %� "" iWA„�,D`e�� By: l By:d:�)fizf� SONDRA E. SMITH, City Clerk/Treasurer ALLEY 675 Cultural Arts District Feet 0 250 500 1,000 DataCultural_District _ Land mark—Build ings Cultural Arts District - Cultural_Arts_District_Building_Footprints - Lots r Hou Cultural Arts District MAPLE ST Student Union Building - U of A Ella Cart) Iture Building - U of A ilding - U of A ibrary - U of AOId Main - U of A University of Arkansas dry Building - U of A ` Business Administration Building - U of eatre - U of A �t 00 LU J J intz House L0 W J J 2 TREADWELL ST PUTMAN ST rn W Q c W J ¢ = J J Hall - U of A W Q Z O rn J C 0 Maple St Overpass REAGAN ST Q W z ILA ST W W 0 z , Pgnolia Co. Filling Station Lafayette St Overpass TRENTON BLVD W Q W DAVIDSON ST Q Q �- Wilson Park HD Q W Y z .M— _ ¢ J } O ¢ J a _ ¢ REBECCA ST DAVIDSON ST W 0 Q Q O W Y Mount Nord HD U W O J O U LAFAYETTE ST Villa Rosa W Greg` ouse > BOLES STQ2rkmll Y L1. 99 Z ALLEA WATSON ST 00 Q U rill„. O H Isco Depot Dick�en St. Z Walt nh— 0 .._ D S )E STOJT > z �,�� >0 O Evergreen Cemetery'? U) U Metro Di rict r I 4 John S. Vest HouseME r' 1 Tharp House {/ r STONE ST > C� (D W Qf Ir PRIVATE 421 `'ED FIR DR W NE pLwy-��U�I- 0 2 z ry W O O Church District f b-0 ALLEY 519 ,lip CENTER ST C7 a nevwe buiiaingl1Wy r� tou3?�Ptr�n�®Gk�,y Id Post Office [TIC LI .. Li Library MOUNTAIN S Lynn lawt W W, Town Cent44aw er Bu' dding L-� DQ W A 3 %. Q rail OU ROCK ST IrU r W Q SOUTH S LU TS soul, ; > 4TH STO Y u �IE ST ., . U , ' Mill District m 5TH ST`” ` 5TH ST LU 987 CD W _U J m Favetteville National Cemetery 9TH Sl 6TH ST = U Jefferson Sch of �g w ¢ Z O H - 9TH ST _z U) Jail W J J 0 �4 00 ¢ O J J Leif Olson Submitted By City of Fayetteville Staff Review Form City Council Agenda Items or Contracts 4 -Sep -07 City Council Meeting Date Planning Division Operations Department X y/q 1°7 Action Required: 07-2079: (Cultural Arts District Boundary): Submitted by Planning Staff to adopt a boundary map for a Cultural Arts $0.00 Cost of this request n/a Account Number n/a Project Number Budgeted Item n/a Category/Project Budget n/a Funds Used to Date n/a $ - Remaining Balance Budget Adjustment Attached n/a Program Category / Project Name n/a Program / Project Category Name n/a Fund Name Previous Ordinance or Resolution # n/a nt blirecto Date Original Contract Date: n/a City Attorney �W . LL, e -24 '67 Finance and Internal Service Director Date Mayor Original Contract Number: n/a Received in City Clerk's Office �ENTERE 1� Received in Mayor's Office ENrERE CITY COUNCIL AGENDA MEMO To: Mayor and City Council Thru: Gary Dumas, Director of Operations Tim Conklin, Planning and Development Management Director ( From: Leif Olson, Long Range Planner Date: August 14, 2007 Subject: Administrative item to adopt a Cultural Arts District Boundary (ADM 07- 2709) RECOMMENDATION Planning Staff recommends approval of a resolution to adopt a Cultural Arts District boundary. BACKGROUND The Downtown Master Plan process created six key principles to guide the future development. These principles were derived as the result of citizen input and good urban design principles. The six key principles are: A superbly walkable environment Downtown living Smart parking Smart rules Special places An experience economy Planning staff has been advancing the action steps associated with these key principles since the Downtown Master Plan was adopted in 2004. The City Council has adopted or approved new downtown zoning districts, building height regulations, one-way street conversions, creation of a TIF district, sidewalk improvements, acquisition of open space for parks and trails, etc. A Cultural Arts Districts is directly related to the sixth principle, "an experience economy". Dover Kohl recommended the creation of a Cultural Arts District to "be an affirmation of the City's commitment to keep Downtown a center for creativity, innovation, and fun. The City, business organizations and cultural institutions should also promote the overlay district in tourist brochures and regional media, and recruit businesses that will enhance the scene to locate there." In late 2004, the Fayetteville Downtown Partners Board of Directors fonned the Cultural Arts District Initiative (CADI) to bring together the arts community and business leaders in order to understand the needs of the arts community and determine how to stimulate the growth of the creative economy. CADI pursued public input through the development of the website www.fayettevillearts.org and an online arts survey which garnered 107 responses. The initiative also hosted informative and participatory monthly meetings of artists and supporters. One of the action items identified was to "Define boundaries of the Fayetteville Cultural Arts District." In 2006, the Planning Commission formed the Cultural Arts District Committee to review the tentative fuzzy boundary proposed by CADI and to recommend a boundary to the Planning Commission and City Council. In July of 2007, the Planning Commission Chairperson requested that Planning Staff review the previous work that has been completed by Fayetteville Downtown Partners, CADI, and the Planning Commission Committee and to then propose hard lines on a map for adoption. Planning staff developed the attached map, which was forwarded to the City Council by the Planning Commission at its August 13, 2007 meeting. DISCUSSION The Planning Commission voted 7-0-0 in favor of this request on August 13, 2007. BUDGET IMPACT None. RESOLUTION NO. A RESOLUTION TO CREATE A CULTURAL ARTS DISTRICT AND SPECIFY ITS BORDERS BE IT RESOLVED BY THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF FAYETTEVILLE, ARKANSAS: Section 1: That the City Council of the City of Fayetteville, Arkansas hereby creates the Cultural Arts District as shown on the map attached as Exhibit A and specifies that its borders shall be as shown on the map. Ltn PASSED and APPROVED this 21st day of August, 2007. APPROVED: ATTEST: DAN COODY, Mayor SONDRA E. SMITH, City Clerk/Treasurer Draft Minutes from the Planning Commission Meeting August 13, 2007 ADM 07-2709: Administrative Item (Cultural Arts District Boundary): Submitted by PLANNING STAFF to create a Cultural Arts District Boundary. Commissioner Anthes, read a background report verbatim discussing the work that had been done by various groups and organizations beginning in 2004. Leif Olson, Long Range Planner, presented a map with Planning Staffs proposed boundary for the Cultural Arts District. Stated that boundary is meant to define the area and be a tool for future discussions concerning arts proposals or initiatives. The boundaries primarily follow the Downtown Master Plan Zoning District boundaries and extend further south to incorporate all of the Mill District and the area around Jefferson School. Public Comment Daniel Hintz, Fayetteville Downtown Partners, stated that this has been an on-going intensive project and that this is a great first step towards creating a great place for artists in the City. Motion: Commissioner Myers made a motion to forward the Cultural Arts District boundary to the City Council for their consideration and adoption. Commissioner Winston seconded the motion. Commissioner Ostner questioned forwarding the map tonight without knowing what it meant in terms of activities that would occur inside this boundary. Olson stated that much of that was yet to be determined. Staff was not involved in the development of this proposal and feels that it will be used as a tool to help to define future discussions and arts initiatives. Commissioner Ostner asked what are the current ideas or discussions that are occurring downtown. Hintz explained that the original proposal included three attitude zones which were distinctly different from each other in terms of the experience of the location. Some City codes have already been amended to facilitate the Arts such as the artist live work permitted use ordinance that was recently passed by the City Council. Commissioner Anthes said that Fayetteville Downtown Partners had outlined the next steps in an eight phase plan that is provided with the background materials. Commissioner Lack stated that he was also concerned about the ramifications of what would go on in this area and that it would take support to follow up and create a feasible Cultural Arts District. Staff should keep this going forward and keep the Planning Commission and the public involved in the process. Upon roll call the motion passed 7-0-0. PROPOSED DISTRICT BOUNDARIES AND INTERNAL ATTITUDE ZONES n� 70 , , •,`is gra. �y t pap, - _at �. ti t%s" .[l C > , # CL# Ef rpNYO{YMMti � uF'. 1 a' r: f � � i' 4� F ,jw i'/{ ,e !■:il1IN1r - t1 aim t p ^u • iLl 419 LID 1 � t ? -•-rya .R........ .. L i, 3 August 2007 Cultural Arts District Committee Page 3 of 3 Page l of 2 Report to City of Fayetteville Planning Commission Fayetteville Downtown Cultural Arts District Boundaries The Downtown Master Plan identified arts and culture as anchor functions of downtown — to be embraced as vital to downtown's economic makeup and as part of the lure of downtown for the next generation of residents and investors. In late 2004, the Fayetteville Downtown Partners Board of Directors formed a task force to respond to the Plan's objective to "make Fayetteville a real cultural destination." The Cultural Arts District Initiative, or CADI, was formed to bring Fayetteville's arts and business leaders together to stimulate the growth of creative enterprise. Our goal was to understand the needs of the creative sector and to determine how those needs might be met to the benefit of downtown's experience economy. Beginning in October 2004, the Cultural Arts District Initiative hosted an online arts survey, which garnered 107 responses to questions ranging from "what kind of arts do you support?" to "what resources are important to your arts practice?" to "what portion of your income comes from your participation in the arts?'' The answers to this survey formed the basis of a dialog to establish goals for the Initiative. By July 2005, the group had established www.fayettevillearts.org — a website to share arts -related news and information for the region. This website has experienced over 25,700 visitors since its inception, with 13,589 visitors to date in 2007 alone. Perhaps most importantly, however, the Initiative hosted informative and participatory monthly meetings of artists and arts supporters. Over time, this group generated a list of over 100 projects cataloged under four objectives, as well as six immediate action items for a sustainable creative community, which are summarized in the handout you received this evening. Using this list, Fayetteville Downtown Partners developed an eight -phase implementation strategy, outlined in the white paper you received at the agenda session. One of the action items was to "Define boundaries of the Fayetteville Cultural Arts District." The Initiative had several discussions centered on a downtown arts district, and a proposed district with "fuzzy" boundaries was drafted to include three experience zones, which were identified by three colors on the proposed map. In 2006, the planning commission formed the Cultural Arts District committee* to review the tentative boundary drafted by the CADI, to provide a narrative for why it is important to identify the district, and to recommend a boundary for consideration of the Planning Commission and City Council. Once sentence of the committee report summarizes the intent of creating the district: "The creation of the Fayetteville Downtown Cultural Arts District formalizes our city's intent to remain the center of innovation and creativity in Northwest Arkansas." The boundary for the Fayetteville Downtown Cultural Arts District presented tonight is unchanged from the map originally drafted by the CADI. The map has been endorsed by CADI, the Fayetteville Downtown Partners Board of Directors and Staff, the Planning Commission Cultural Arts District Committee, and the newly formed Fayetteville Arts Council. Staff has Report io Chy of Fayetteville Planning Connnission, 13 Angusi 2007 Page 2 of 2 reviewed the committee report and supplemental information in your packet, as well as the proposed district map, and has proposed the hard boundary before you for a vote tonight. We hope that the full planning commission will also support the creation of this District and forward the map to City Council this evening. It is important to note that setting the district boundary, while an important step, only puts lines on the map. No programs or funding mechanisms are attached to the formation of the District. It will be up to the City, artists, arts patrons, residents, and business leaders to complete and support the steps necessary to create a viable and relevant Downtown Cultural Arts District that supports the creative sector and promotes Fayetteville's creative economy. r *The committee was comprised of Commissioners Clark, Bryant, and Anthes and three members of the arts community, Jodi Beznoska of the WAC, Julie Gabel of Ceramic Cow Productions, and Dede Peters of ddp gallery. The committee was staffed by Daniel Hintz, Executive Director of FDP, under a contract for services with the City of Fayetteville. Two of these committee members have since been appointed to the new Fayetteville Arts Council, the creation of which was another deliverable of the CADI. Report to City of Fayeneville Planning Connnission, 13 August 2007 fayettevillearts.org - fayettev. " irkansas cultural arts district initiative > ,DI Objectives Page 1 of 4 yettevillearts.or - fayetteville arkansas cultural arts district initiative '�:� 2007 Fayetteville Arts Festival CADI Obiectives Cultural Arts District Initiative ACTION ITEMS • Establish a.Fayetteville Arts Commission • Produce an expanded Fayetteville Arts Festival • Define boundaries of the Fayetteville Cultural Arts District • Write and implement a Public Art Policy/Define and develop a Museum Without Walls • Develop and support a sustainable Downtown Gallery Arts Walk • Facilitate certification of AIE/Rostered Artists at the state level OUR OBJECTIVES • Increase opportunities for artists. • Strengthen the arts infrastructure. • Increase audiences for the arts. • Enhance young people's access to the arts. Objective 1: Increase opportunities for artists. • Expand the Fayetteville Arts Festival • Offer opportunities for artists to show work • Offer educational opportunities such as filing taxes, marketing, resume development, curating, grant writing • ' Develop alternative rehearsal/performing space and art venues • Offer art hanging service to local businesses • Negotiate bulk rates and discount opportunities for artists with frequently used merchants • Expand marketing opportunities • Offer professional services to artists, such as taxes, health care, etc. • Develop "healing arts" programming with hospitals, schools, etc. • Develop a resource clearinghouse for artists including sources for materials, shows/contests, galleries, frame shops, etc. • Strengthen partnership opportunities between artists and mediums • Develop residency programs • Public Art Initiatives • Buy a van to advertise artists • Bring in big budget films • Create mentoring opportunities between newer artists and established artists • Develop partnerships between artists and producers/sellers, business/art http://www.fayettevillearts.org/goals/ 8/12/2007 fayettevillearts.org - fayettei arkansas cultural arts district initiative kDI Objectives Page 2 of 4 • Strengthen advocacy for local artists with local, state and federal officials Objective 2: Strengthen the arts infrastructure. • Develop an arts advocacy group such as a Fayetteville Arts Commission • Develop a sister city program for artists to help get work out into a more broad community • Support existing venues, establish new, sustainable spaces • Offer inexpensive studio spaces • Create incentives through business partnerships to invest in the arts infrastructure • Create a interactive and usable website • Promote the positives of buying local • Create a walkable and accessible Cultural Arts District • Health Insurance • Develop affordable live/work space for artists • Actively fundraise for sustainable programming • I% for the arts • Art Walk/Gallery Walk • Develop a resource center for all things art and arts related • Create a tax incentive for investing in arts • Be a granting agency • Build an arts incubator space • Create an art co-op Objective 3: Increase audiences for the arts. • % for the arts program to expand public exposure to the arts • Bring in arts workshops, seminars • More media coverage • A regular arts review column in the paper • Local art in homes during events, parties — rental opportunities • Media/marketing campaign about Fayetteville and the arts • Advertise in local and state publications • Partner with community television. • Public art projects • Database of art collectorsibuyers in the region • Creating a directory of artists and their work • Expand and really market the Fayetteville Arts Festival Objective 4: Enhance young people's access to the arts. • Advertise private art classes • Art classes for young and old • Educational Workshops • Residencies • Public art • Make the Fayetteville Arts Festival hip, cool and inviting for young people • Create jobs in the arts for young people, paid summer internships • Kids and film programs • All ages music shows http://www.fayettevillearts.org/goals/ 8/12/2007 FAYETTEVILLE DOWNTOWN CULTURAL ARTS DISTRICT PART ONE: Recommendations of the City of Fayetteville Planning Commission I Cultural Arts District Committee CITY OF FAYETTEVILLE PLANNING COMMISSION j CULTURAL ARTS DISTRICT COMMITTEE SUMMARY AND RECOMMENDATIONS FOR THE FAYETTEVILLE DOWNTOWN CULTURAL ARTS DISTRICT PURPOSE The purpose of the Fayetteville Downtown Cultural Arts District is to strengthen the creative sector, which is of direct financial benefit to the city. A downtown cultural arts district will capitalize on local and regional assets and investment, while enhancing the cultural, economic, and social framework of Fayetteville. DEFINITION A cultural arts district is generally: - a geographically defined area generating creative goods and services that promote and enhance a .city's identity while strengthening economic development efforts - a mixed-use area with a high concentration of cultural facilities and related activities - a reflection of a city's unique environment, including historic land use, future urban growth, and cultural development The creation of the Fayetteville Downtown Cultural Arts District formalizes our city's intent to remain the center of innovation and creativity in Northwest Arkansas. BENEFITS Cultural Arts Districts across the country have proven their worth by creating jobs, broadening municipal tax bases, retaining residents, and attracting visitors. These districts also influence business development and expansion decisions, inspire downtown revitalization and historic preservation, build community identity, and stimulate the growth of creative enterprise. The Fayetteville Downtown Cultural Arts District is expected to: - attract new visitors - support recruitment of an innovative and competitive workforce - spur continued investment in area properties - increase new and existing business activity - enhance sales and HMR tax revenues BOUNDARIES Downtown Fayetteville has distinct areas where cultural activities already occur, making them logical places for inclusion into a cultural arts district: , . Dickson Street, in close proximity to the Walton Arts Center and the University of Arkansas, has long been associated with activities that support a cultural arts district. Artists are finding affordable studio and gallery space in the Mill District on the southern edge of downtown. This dynamic district is home to the Thursday night Farmers Market, La Maison des Tartes, and Nightbird Books. Several new developments are underway, bringing more housing and storefront retail/restaurant opportunities. The Jennings Plus neighborhood, just south of Archibald Yell and north of Sixth Street, is home to several artists and studio spaces, and there is momentum to establish the former Jefferson Elementary School as the Jefferson Center for Arts and Education. 3 August 2007 Cultural Arts District Committee Page 1 of 3 The proposed boundaries for the Fayetteville Downtown Cultural Arts District, therefore, serve to formalize the current cultural and physical development and market trends that overlap within downtown. The proposed boundary is roughly Maple Street to Sixth Street and Arkansas Avenue to College Avenue / South School per the attached map. NEXT STEPS A viable and relevant cultural arts district is tied to services that support the creative sector. The committee therefore, supports the following recommendations of Fayetteville Downtown Partners as necessary steps in the process: - identify and/or create an entity to implement and manage district - conduct a comprehensive inventory of the creative' sector within the district - develop a comprehensive cultural arts district strategic plan that includes short and long-term goals and milestones to measure the success of the plan - work with the State of Arkansas and Washington County to identify district investment incentives and opportunities - develop local incentives that fill the investment incentive gaps - establish short- and long-term funding mechanisms BACKGROUND_ £; The Cultural Arts District Committee was charged with the following tasks: to review the tentative boundary drafted by the Cultural Arts District Initiative (www.fayettevillea rts.org) - to provide a narrative for why it is important to identify the district to recommend a boundary for consideration of the full Planning Commission The Cultural Arts Distric+ Committee members included Planning Commissioners Jill Anthes, Lois Bryant, and Candy Clark; Jodi Beznoska, Walton Arts Center; Julie Gabel, Ceramic Cow Productions; and Dede Peters, ddp gallery. The Cultural Arts District Committee was staffed by Daniel Hintz of Fayetteville Downtown Partners, under contract with the City of Fayetteville. 3 August 2007 Cultural Arts District Committee Page 2 of 3 PROPOSED DISTRICT BOUNDARIES AND INTERNAL ATTITUDE ZONES CVLJ q LO ro r ew C CrL� &V, :L Ud" '41 1 kc IM Li a er t, 7�. a . � r7, Al It 'If j-jr 41 kyjEp 1411 T I Ym OA= U D -q L 4C� 7W z t 44 i 6=1 n i r, AUR El rj 4 u 1ffi 7 D Mt, A> V..Q L I I Alie il' Af to 'A T-, z 4=4 11`� 1 , Ma Jq 14�1 wir" a 471 C L b, P 3 August 2007 Cultural Arts District Committee Page 3 of 3 The Cultural Arts District: Heartbeat of Fayetteville's Creative Economy MMM THE CULTURAL ARTS DISTRICT INITIATIVE In 2005, the City of Fayetteville contracted with Fayetteville Downtown Partners (FDP) to identify the structure, boundaries, and services of a downtown Cultural Arts District. The Cultural Arts District Initiative (CADI) has taken a multi -phase approach in order to create a sustainable district. Those phases are as follows: Phase 1: Create and maintain www.fayettevillearts.org Phase 2: Expand the Fayetteville Arts Festival Phase 3: Participate in Americans for the Arts "Arts & Economic Prosperity III" study Phase 4: Develop and define an artist live/work use unit for the Unified Development Code of Fayetteville Phase 5: Enact a Public Art Policy for the City of Fayetteville Phase 6: Create a Fayetteville Arts Council Phase 7: Define boundaries and potential services of a Cultural Arts District Phase 8: Implement Cultural Arts District plan FDP initiated Phase 7 with the submission of this report to Planning Commission in late 2006. DEFINITION OF A CULTURAL ARTS DISTRICT The Fayetteville Cultural Arts District is a geographically defined, well -organized, labeled, mixed- use area capitalizing on local and regional assets that are specific to the cultural, economic, and social issues of the community. The district emphasizes the area's high concentration of creative assets and related activities, while strengthening and enhancing the creative sector of the city. DEFINITION OF THE CREATIVE SECTOR The creative sector includes people and companies whose product or intellectual :property is associated with art, design or performance, services are defined by art or design, and/or companies that sell, supply or contribute to art or design -dependent products. Examples include potters, jewelers, musicians, advertising agencies, architects, galleries, theatre compani.ev and high fashion clothing boutiques. PURPOSE OF A CULTURAL ARTS DISTRICT The purpose of the Fayetteville Cultural Arts District is to strengthen and enhance the creative sector of the city, which provides direct benefit to the city in which they live, work, and.play. It may be helpful to consider a Cultural Arts District as an "industrial park" for the Creative Sector — a defined area generating creative goods and services that promotes and enhances Fayetteville's identity as a culturally rich city, while strengthening current economic development efforts. The creation of the district ensures our city remains the region's epicenter of innovation and creativity — paying substantial dividends across the economic and social spectrum. BENEFITS OF A CULTURAL ARTS DISTRICT The Fayetteville Cultural Arts District is expected to attract new visitors and knowledge-based industry and to spur continued investment in the area's properties. The creation of the Fayetteville Cultural Arts District is projected to increase new and existing business activity and enhance sales and HMR tax revenues. PROPOSED BOUNDARIES The boundaries for the Fayetteville Cultural Arts District are composed of edges that flow with the cultural and physical development, as well as market trends, that overlap within the downtown area. The boundary is roughly Maple Street to Sixth Street and Arkansas Avenue to North College Avenue/South School Avenue. Page 2 of 11 PROJECT OVERVIEW The Fayetteville Downtown Master Plan identified the need to "create a Cultural and Entertainment District overlay to coordinate the evolution of the area and to establish a fairly compact geographic limit within which these activities should be focused" (Downtown Master Plan, Plan Fundamentals 2.21). In October 2004, FDP began the process to identify the structure and services of a downtown Cultural and Entertainment district. In early 2005, the City of Fayetteville contracted with FDP to support the organization's efforts in developing a sustainable Cultural Arts District. Coupled with the Walton Arts Center's 2002 Regional Arts Plan findings, FDP researched 54 cities and conducted numerous informational interviews with arts management organizations and peer city planning departments. FDP developed a website (www.fayettevillearts.org) which hosted an online arts survey to help identify the needs of our local creative sector. The organization also facilitated 22 public feedback and brainstorming sessions and held numerous individual meetings with Fayetteville elected officials, City of Fayetteville staff, individual artists, cultural organizations, and business leaders. THE FINDINGS The establishment of a Cultural Arts District should be recognized as an ongoing initiative. Fully realizing the benefits of such a district will take coordination between several groups, including City of Fayetteville staff, the Mayor's office, the Fayetteville Arts Council, City Council, Planning Commission, individual artists and arts organizations, and businesses. Establishing a Cultural Arts District in Fayetteville will involve long-term vision, planning and commitment, and should seek to capitalize on regional assets that are specific to the cultural, economic and social issues of Fayetteville. A sustainable district will require specialized management. Cultural Arts Districts vs. Entertainment Districts :. The Downtown Master Plan recommended a small, defined boundary that focused primarily on the Walton Arts Center and the surrounding entertainment venues on Dickson Street, calling this overlay district the Cultural and Entertainment District. The process to develop the boundaries of an entertainment district are very similar to that of a cultural district; however, the various codes and ordinances that accompany entertainment -focused zones were found to be more defined and explicit due to the nature of an "entertainment district. These areas also had a tendency to be smaller in size and focused heavily on supporting bars, restaurants and retail — although cultural and arts components are still vital to their long-term viability. Cultural districts are larger in scope and size and address a broader base of needs. They are specifically focused on the creative economy — such as artists, galleries, and performance space, .. Bars, restaurants, and retail are also important components of a cultural district, but .the rules governing the development of these businesses are not usually as formal as in the entertainment district. Definition of a Cultural Arts District A Cultural Arts District is defined as a well -organized, labeled, mixed-use area of a city with a high concentration of cultural activities that serve as the anchor of attraction. Typically, the area is geographically defined and incorporates other land uses. The defining characteristic, however, is the concentration of cultural facilities and related activities. Generally, cultural arts districts support the fine arts (concert halls, theaters, and galleries) as well as libraries, historical museums and educational institutions. The district can include restaurants, nightclubs and other forms of popular entertainment as well. They can also include the companion commercial businesses that provide necessary supplies or support for these endeavors. Page 3 of 11 Overall, however, a cultural arts district can emphasize major fine arts and entertainment as well as primary cultural activities in the district including arts presentations, productions, and education. Factors in creating a Cultural Arts District Structural 1. Perceived need for revitalization The perceived need for revitalization of an area is a key factor affecting the creation of a cultural district. 2. Extent of investment near target site Extensive redevelopment in neighboring areas may indicate that property owners and developers have an interest in protecting their investment by ensuring that adjacent areas are also revitalized. 3. Number of preexisting cultural facilities In most of "the cultural districts, at least two or three important cultural facilities predated to the development or designation of the district. 4. Presence of tourist sites Cultural districts benefit from the crossover traffic of convention centers, unique historic or heritage sites, parks or other natural areas located close by. 5. Preexisting Land Use The other types of land uses such as current and potential housing, retail and office space are important to the siting and eventual constitution of a cultural district. 6. Property Value If costs associated with property acquisition; construction, taxes, parking and other accessibility issues, regulation, and zoning.are.not competitive with other parts of the city, attracting new investment could prove difficult.:, - 7. Zoning and other development restrictions To encourage the type of growth desired, cultural districts may require modifications of zoning ordinances and building codes to, for example, permit housing or develop living or work space for artists. Zoning issues .can lead to. creative financing arrangements, and legislation can be created to provide exemptions on sales and income taxes to artists and performers who live within the whole district or particular development zones within the district. Community Leadership 1. Arts organizations, artists and other local arts agencies A cultural district may form where the demand by arts organizations for cultural arts spaces coincides with an interest in revitalization and where old theaters, schools, and other facilities are available at below-market prices. In many cities, the local arts agencies have served as the primary instigator in the development of the cultural arts district. 2. Government.agencies 'The development of virtually every cultural district in the United States has relied to some degree on the cooperation and support of city, county and/or state government officials for funding, planning assistance, favorable zoning ordinances, and arrangement for services such as policing and sanitation. Government financing for cultural districts may include grants, loan and bond authority for capital development or tax -based subsidies for operations. 3. Development authorities These quasi- or nongovernmental agencies often hold public authority to plan development citywide or in a designated portion of the city, often exercising bonding authority to promote the development of facilities. 4. Downtown business groups Most of the cultural districts created under the primary leadership of downtown business groups tend to be of the arts and entertainment type. Page 4 of 11 5. Property owners, residents and historic preservation groups The coordination of the interests of multiple owners and users of a proposed cultural district is one of the most complicated issues facing the development and maintenance of the district. 6. "Competing" cultural facilities The number and strength of cultural facilities in other parts of the city can be key to the designation and development of a cultural district. Non -district groups, however, may create some resistance over development of a district in which they do not reside because they fear they will no longer be considered for funding or lose patrons. Social Forces 1. General economic status The general economic status of a city may be a significant factor in cultural district development. 2. City demographics Undesirable gentrification is a huge issue to consider in cultural district development. In some cities, arts development played a key role in displacing lower-income residents and ironically, those artists who had been at the development's vanguard. The district also needs to ensure that cultural events and activities reflect every citizen's experience and culture. Cultural districts must respond to this challenge by providing access to diverse arts organizations and programming. 3. Political forces Declining federal and state funds for capital investment in urban development and shrinking subsidies for social and cultural programs are among the political forces at work. Proponents of cultural districts .must identify new sources of private funding for the development and support of their facilities and programming. Boundaries of a Cultural ArtrDistricl A Cultural Arts District typically reflects,a.city's unique environment, including historic land use, future urban growth, and cultural development.. As a result, Cultural Arts Districts are unique and have very specific needs that shift as the district- matures. Fayetteville currently has several distinct areas where a variety of activities is already occurring, making those logical places for inclusion into a Cultural Arts District. Dickson Street, with its high concentration of restaurants, bars, as well as its close proximity to the University of Arkansas and the Walton Arts Center, demands immediate attention. It has long been associated with the sort of activities that are included in a Cultural Arts District. Other areas, however, are also developing and attracting a variety of unique mix of endeavors. Artists are. finding affordable studio.and gallery space in the Mill District on the southern edge:of . downtown. This dynamic district is home to the Thursday night Farmer's Market, La Maison des Tartes and Nightbird Books. In addition, several new developments are currently being built, bringing more housing and storefront retail/restaurant opportunities. The Jennings Plus' neighborhood, just south of Archibald Yell and north of Sixth Street is home to several artists and studio spaces, and there is momentum to establish the former Jefferson Elementary School as the Jefferson Center for Arts and Education. To capture these types of activity currently happening within Fayetteville, the proposed boundaries for the Fayetteville Cultural Arts District are composed of soft edges that flow with the cultural and physical development, as well as current and future market trends, that overlap within the downtown area. Page 5 of 1 1 Benefits of a Cultural Arts District The assets that communities once touted as unique now represent nothing more than the opportunity to compete in today's market for jobs and industry. Cultural Arts Districts across the country have proven their worth by creating jobs, broadening the tax base, and attracting and retaining people to live, work and play in the cities in which these districts were established. These districts also influence business development and expansion decisions, inspire downtown revitalization and historic preservation, build community identity, and stimulate the growth of creative enterprise. The creation of the district ensures our city remains the region's epicenter of innovation and creativity — paying substantial dividends across the economic and social spectrum. The Fayetteville Cultural Arts District focuses attention on our creative sector, which helps to generate real wealth. Arts, Culture, and Economics Since first entering the ranks of the Forbes 2003 Best Small Metros at #3, the Fayetteville area has continued to make "Best of" lists around the country. The city ranked #5 on the 2004 Best Small Metros list and then jumped size categories in 2005 to compete in the Best Metro category, ranking #7 ahead of destination cities such as Norfolk, Atlanta and Madison. The city was ranked #9 in 2006, just squeaking past Indianapolis. While Fayetteville has remained nationally competitive in categories such as job and income growth, the area has also consistently ranked low in Arts, Culture, and Entertainment (Ranking 88th in 2004, 148th in 2005 and 196th in 2006). This has caused some significant challenges to our self -described identity as an epicenter of arts and culture, and has hampered our ability to recruit and retain high -skilled, high -paying jobs — a centerpiece of Fayetteville's economic development strategy. Northwest Arkansas Northwest Arkansas was one of.] 56 communities that participated in the 2007 Arts and Economic Prosperity III: The Economic Impact of Nonprofit Arts and Cultural Organizations and Their. Audiences. in Northwest Arkansas This -regional. study was commissioned by the Walton Arts Center, Fayetteville, Downtown Partners and several economic development agencies. The study focuses solely on the economic impact.of.nonprofit arts and cultural organizations and the event -related spending by their audiences. While limited in scope, the study still provides an overview of the economic impact of the arts. Data was collected from 17 nonprofit arts and cultural organizations in Northwest Arkansas. Total spending for those nonprofit arts and cultural organizations and their audiences totaled $16.21 million in 2005. The direct impact — that is, the initial economic effect of these expenditures — is as follows: Page 6 of 11 Northwest Arkansas Median of Similar National Median Study Regions (pop. 250,000 — 499,000) Total Expenditures $16,210,374 $60,304,046 $41,315,605 Full -Time Equivalent 295 941 778 Jobs Resident Household $5,396,000 $17,083,000 $13,519,000 Income Local Government $157,000 $959,000 $845,000 Revenue State Government $534,000 $1,409,000 $1,593,000 Revenue Page 6 of 11 These numbers highlight the current revenue gap between Northwest Arkansas and peer cities, opening opportunities (and a subsequent return on investment) for further investment in the creative sector. These direct economic impacts create an additional indirect economic impact. Of particular interest is the indirect impact of the creative economy. By calculating the direct and indirect impact (TOTAL IMPACT), Full Time Equivalent jobs increase by 76%, Resident Household Income increases by 100% and Local Government Revenue increases by 117%. The gap between Northwest Arkansas and Similar Study Regions also increases. The following numbers reflect the total economic impact — direct and indirect. . Arkansas According to Creativity in the Natural State: Growing Arkansas' Creative Economy rele.ased..by: Regional, Technology Strategies (RTS) in 2007, 40% of all non-governmental jobs 'in Arkansas were 'in manufacturing in 1984. Between 2000 and 2004, the state lost about 10,000 of those jobs, with manufacturing -employment dropping to 20% for the first time • since 1;942. When compared to more conventional clusters presented to the state by the Monitor Group in.. 2007, the. creative economy ranks as the third fastest growing economic. cluster in the state, ranking ahead of major state industries such as forest products, automotive, and even hospitality and tourism. RTS also examined how the size of the creative economy affects various economic indicators. They discovered that a concentration of arts and design workers has a significant impact on employment growth. Actual employment growth in Arkansas between 1990 and 2000 grew by 24%. The model they developed through their study indicated that without Arkansas' creative economy, that growth would have only been 15%. Similarly, Arkansas' new businesses, which grew 18%, would have only grown 13%. United States According to the 2007 national study done by Americans for the Arts, the nonprofit arts and cultural industries generates $166.2 billion in economic activity annually — a 24% increase over the past five years. This spending supports 5.7 million full time jobs — an increase of 850,000 since their 2002 study on the nonprofit creative economy. This industry generates nearly $30 billion in revenue to local, state, and federal governments per year. In comparison, these three levels of government spend less that $4 billion annually to support arts and culture. This is a 7:1 return on investment in the nonprofit creative economy. These nonprofit cultural institutions also leverage additional spending by their audiences — pumping vital revenue into restaurants, hotels, retail stores, and other businesses. Page 7 of 11 Northwest Arkansas Median of Similar National Median Study Regions (pop. 250,000 — 499,000) Total Expenditures $16,210,374 $60,304,046 $411315,605 Full -Time Equivalent 518 1,512 1,386 Jobs Resident Household $9,791,000 $30,328,000 $26,369,000 Income Local Government $342,000 $2,536,000 $2,486,000 Revenue State Government $1,123,000 $2,830,000 $3,042,000 Revenue Arkansas According to Creativity in the Natural State: Growing Arkansas' Creative Economy rele.ased..by: Regional, Technology Strategies (RTS) in 2007, 40% of all non-governmental jobs 'in Arkansas were 'in manufacturing in 1984. Between 2000 and 2004, the state lost about 10,000 of those jobs, with manufacturing -employment dropping to 20% for the first time • since 1;942. When compared to more conventional clusters presented to the state by the Monitor Group in.. 2007, the. creative economy ranks as the third fastest growing economic. cluster in the state, ranking ahead of major state industries such as forest products, automotive, and even hospitality and tourism. RTS also examined how the size of the creative economy affects various economic indicators. They discovered that a concentration of arts and design workers has a significant impact on employment growth. Actual employment growth in Arkansas between 1990 and 2000 grew by 24%. The model they developed through their study indicated that without Arkansas' creative economy, that growth would have only been 15%. Similarly, Arkansas' new businesses, which grew 18%, would have only grown 13%. United States According to the 2007 national study done by Americans for the Arts, the nonprofit arts and cultural industries generates $166.2 billion in economic activity annually — a 24% increase over the past five years. This spending supports 5.7 million full time jobs — an increase of 850,000 since their 2002 study on the nonprofit creative economy. This industry generates nearly $30 billion in revenue to local, state, and federal governments per year. In comparison, these three levels of government spend less that $4 billion annually to support arts and culture. This is a 7:1 return on investment in the nonprofit creative economy. These nonprofit cultural institutions also leverage additional spending by their audiences — pumping vital revenue into restaurants, hotels, retail stores, and other businesses. Page 7 of 11 Research by the Travel Industry Association of America and Partners in Tourism indicate that 65% of all adult travelers included a cultural event while on a trip of 50 miles or more away from home of which 32% extended their trip because of that event. Compared to all U.S. travelers, cultural travelers spend more ($631 vs. $457), use hotels, motels, or bed -and -breakfasts (62% vs. 56%) and are likely to shop (44% vs. 33%). FAYETTEVILLE DOWNTOWN PARTNERS' RECOMMENDATIONS A viable and relevant Cultural Arts District is not simply about its boundaries. This district is also the sum of its services that support the creative sector within its boundaries. We recommend the following for the creation of a sustainable and relevant Cultural Arts District: 1. Identify and/or create an entity to implement and manage district. 2. The district should be bounded as roughly West Lafayette Street on the North, Arkansas Avenue/University Avenue on the West, North College Avenue/Archibald Yell/South School Avenue on the East, and Sixth Street on the South. 3. Conduct a comprehensive inventory of the creative sector within the district. 4. Develop a comprehensive Cultural Arts District strategic plan that includes short- and long- term goals and milestones to measure success of plan. 5. Identify codes and ordinances that support Cultural Arts District goals, with understanding that Dickson Street issues will need specific focus as an entertainment focused area. 6. Work with,the State of Arkansas and Washington County to identify district investment incentives and opportunities, and develop local incentives that fill the investment incentive gaps. 7. Establish short- and long-term funding mechanisms. INFORMATION SOURCES Arts & Economic Prosperity III, Americans for the Arts, 2007 .. . Arts & Economic Prosperity III: The Economic Impact of Nonprofit. Arts and Cultural., Organizations and Their Audiences, Americans for the Arts, 2007 = ,The.Creative City: A Tool Kit for Urban Innovators, Landy,.Charles, 2000 . .Cultural Districts: The Arts as a Strategy for Revitalizing Our Cities. Americans for the .: Arts, 1998 => The Creative City Policy Sourcebook: Developing an Urban Agenda for the New Economy. Partners for Livable Communities, 2004 "Developing an Arts -Based Economic Development Strategy in Your Community", Neighborhood Reinvestment Training Institute, 2002 => Arts & Economic Prosperity: The Economic Impact of Nonprofit Arts Organizations and Their Audiences II. Americans for the Arts, 2002 => "The Arts in the GDP: Consumers Spent $9.4 Billion on Admission Receipts for Performing Arts Events in 1998"; National Endowment for the Arts, 2000 = .Americans for the Arts database of 133 cities with. designated cultural districts, 24 cities with cultural master plans and 58 cities with percentage for the arts plans. => ePodunk (www.epodunk.com) provided the "Top Ten College Towns" list, which we used to identify zones and codes that support a cultural arts district or entertainment district with a student population in mind. => Fayetteville Downtown Partners staff conducted online research on 54 city websites for special downtown, entertainment district, and/or cultural district zones/codes and conducted follow-up informational interviews with 17 city planning departments. Of those 54 cities, 23 had relevant and/or downloadable information. We can provide copies of these ordinances by request. Page 8 of 1 1 APPENDIX Some local nonprofit arts organizations projected economic impact can be identified through the Americans for the Arts Arts & Economic Prosperity Calculator. The analyses is based on research findings from the 91 communities that were part of Arts & Economic Prosperity, Americans for the Arts' national economic impact study of nonprofit arts organizations and their audiences. Arts and Economic Prosperity Calculator Definitions Total Expenditures: The total dollars spent by nonprofit arts organization and its audiences; event - related spending by arts audiences is estimated using the average dollars spent per person by arts event attendees in similarly populated communities. FTE Jobs: The total number of full-time equivalent (FTE) jobs in the community that are supported by the expenditures made by arts organization and/or its audiences. An FTE can be one full-time employee, two half-time employees, or four employees who work quarter -time. Household Income: The total dollars paid to community residents as a result of the expenditures made by an arts organization and/or its audiences. Household income includes salaries, wages, and proprietary income. Government Revenue: The total dollars received by local and state governments (e.g. license fees, taxes) as a result of the expenditures made by an arts organization and/or its audiences. http: //ww3.arts usa.org/information—resources/economic—im pact/cal cu/ator.htmi Walton Arts Center (www.waltonartscehter.org) Total Expenses - $6,000,000 Total Arts Audiences — 140,000 2006 Fayetteville Arts Festival (www.fayettevillea rts.org) Total Expenses - $98,000 Total Arts Audiences — 9,000 Total FTE Jobs Household Local State Expenditures Income Government Government Revenue Revenue Impact of $6,000,000 202 $4,543;560 _ $170,460 $31 %080 "Nonprofit Orgs. "Impact of $3,094,000 105 $1,586,170 $99,472 $242,167 Nonprofit Audiences TOTAL $9,094,000 307 $6,129,730 $268,932 $552,247 IMPACT 2006 Fayetteville Arts Festival (www.fayettevillea rts.org) Total Expenses - $98,000 Total Arts Audiences — 9,000 Page 9 of 11 Total FTE Jobs Household Local State Expenditures Income Government Government Revenue Revenue Impact of $98,000 3 $74,200 $2,784 $5,065 Nonprofit Orgs. Impact of $198,900 7 $101,968 $6,395 $15,568 Nonprofit Audiences TOTAL $296,900 10 $176,168 $9,179 $20,633 IMPACT Page 9 of 11 Ceramic Cow Productions Total Expenses - $13,500 Total Arts Audiences - 1.135 i Total FTE Jobs Household Local State Expenditures Income Government Government Revenue Revenue Impact of $13,500 0 $10,223 $384 $698 Nonprofit Orgs. c Impact of $25,084 1 $12,859 $806 $1,963 Nonprofit Audiences TOTAL $38,584 1 $23,082 $1,190 $2,661 IMPACT . TheatreSquared (www.theatresquared.org) Total Expenses - $134,595 Total Arts Audiences - 3.350 North Arkansas Symphony Orchestra (www.nasymphony.org) Total Expenses - $581,025 Total Arts Audiences - 4.335 Total FTE Jobs Household Local State Expenditures Income Government Government Revenue Revenue Impact of $134,595 5 $101,923 $3,824 $6,956 Nonprofit Orgs. c Impact of $74,035 3 $37,955 $2,380 $5,795 Nonprofit Audiences TOTAL $208,630 8 $139,878 $6,204 $12,751 IMPACT North Arkansas Symphony Orchestra (www.nasymphony.org) Total Expenses - $581,025 Total Arts Audiences - 4.335 Page 10 of 11 Total FTE Jobs Household Local State Expenditures Income Government Government Revenue Revenue Impact of $581,025 20 $439,987 $16,507 $30,027 Nonprofit Orgs. c Impact of $95,804 3 $49,115 $3,080 $7,499 Nonprofit Audiences TOTAL $676,829 23 $489,102 $19,587 $37,526 IMPACT Page 10 of 11 Arts Live Theatre (www.artslivetheatre.com) Total Expenses — $109,145 Total Arts Audiences — 2,322 Dance Coalition (www.dancecoalition.com) Total Expenses - $13,822 Total Arts Audiences — 450 Total FTE Jobs Household Local State Expenditures Income Government Government Revenue Revenue Impact of $109,145 4 $82,651 $3,101 $5,641 Nonprofit Orgs. Impact of $51,31.6 2 $26,308 $1,650 $4,017 Nonprofit Audiences TOTAL $160,461 6 $108,959 $4,751 $9,658 IMPACT Dance Coalition (www.dancecoalition.com) Total Expenses - $13,822 Total Arts Audiences — 450 Page 11 of 11 Total FTE Jobs Household Local State Expenditures Income Government Government Revenue Revenue Impact of $13,822 0 $10,467 $393 $714 Nonprofit Orgs. Impact of $9,945 0 $5,098 $320 $778 Nonprofit Audiences TOTAL $23,767 0 $15,565 $713 $1,492 IMPACT Page 11 of 11 ALLEY 675 MAPLE ST Student Union Building - U of A Ella e Building - U of A ng -UofA U of AOId Main - U of A University of Arkansas Building - U ofA ` Business Administration Building - U of -UofA M IT 00 L0 >- w w J J J J ¢ ¢ W Z U House z Q TREADWELL ST PUTMAN ST N N Cultural Arts District Cl)(70 W Q Feet w -j Er 0 250 500 1,000 z ILA ST LU DataCultural_District _ Land mark -Buildings LLJ >Q U Cultural Arts District z M Cultural -Arts _District _Building_Footprints O U J ¢ = Lots :er Hous Cultural Arts District J ¢ MAPLE ST Student Union Building - U of A Ella e Building - U of A ng -UofA U of AOId Main - U of A University of Arkansas Building - U ofA ` Business Administration Building - U of -UofA M IT 00 L0 >- w w J J J J ¢ ¢ W Z U House z Q TREADWELL ST PUTMAN ST N N Cl)(70 w Q _J = w -j STONE ST 'QED FIR DR W�NSlONE D Maple St Overpass TRENTON BLVD Q w¢ DAVIDSON ST Q z ILA ST >- Wilson Park HD 0 W0 LU ¢ w Z > ¢ M W Q = U) ¢ = LU J a¢ n = J ¢ REBECCA ST DAVIDSON ST ill -UofA W LU _... ¢ ¢,�: W REAGAN ST Y Mo ; O U J O yyy �yagnolia Co. Filling StationUJI "! Lafayette St overpass LAFAYETTE ST "ifa Rosa Q :1::� w 0 DGregg House > BOLES STQ ALL Y 99 ¢ ALLEY 333 LU Q <(/ IE ST OJT > � ALLEY 519 ¢U)LU J Z J C.7 TS NST 0 Of z (� Church Dis f- risco`Depot igen St. Z Walton Arts nter; � 2rN DST w' ¢ -[w t91A � J Z �l(/� W OJ J >Va¢ Evergreen CemeteryQ Uj O O UJ x O PRIVATE 421 G 987 J a z ir w O CD 0 _U J m M 3 (n 1kRING S w Metro Di s rict Li> C John S. vest House MEADOW ST Y } Tharp House O ¢ � mage Iwuse CENTER ST ank of Fayetteville Bull` a t� ;tone u �171f3n2t5§n�®t9gg ' •rl.w' to :God �—v+ d Post.010 ' Library MOUNTAINS 13J nn Sheitoi r a erBuilding W J Town Cent w A 3 Lj Frisc Trail L) OCK ST J '+moi U LliN� .. G 4 SOU�N SOUT(I 7" w > .t woLU Q Y 4TH STY PRAI IE ST QOw Mill District m -� ¢ 5TH S T b O - 5TH ST O 6TH ST rson Sch of is* 0 tfg o�- Favetteville National Cemetery 9TH Sl LU z O i - 9TH ST z 2 U) w z O C7 _z 2 rn w Q Z O F- C� _z 2 rn Jail W Q J _J C,Nrav�- `4 CDu'^ ` P i1't2:l i `� �'� Page 1 of 1 Doug Walsh From: alan ostner [alan.ostner@sbcglobal.het] Sent: Tuesday, September 04, 2007 5:13 PM To: Doug Walsh Subject: Re: Cultural District Dear Aldermen - As Neighborhood President of the Jennings- Plus Addition, the Cultural Arts District could directly affect our neighborhood. Since the exact definition of this district has yet to be determined, many of us are tentatively in favor of it at this time. Our N.A. has not had a formal meeting on this topic, but from the conversations have had with my neighbors, most folks are IN FAVOR of the district. On the issue of the boundary, I can also say that most of the neighbors I have spoken to are IN FAVOR of our neighborhood being included in this District. However, without knowing the meaning of this district it is hard to be completely in favor of it. Some of the items folks seem to be interested in encouraging in this District are: 1. Allowing and encouraging Artist Live/Work units that are neighborly and don't bother neighbors with noise or fumes, or too much traffic from customers. 2. Public Art being in more public spaces. 3. Festivals and other outdoor events ocurring easily as long as their general impact is neighborly. 4. Including the Jefferson Building in any of these proposals. Most of the neighbors would appreciate a meeting with specific proposals for the activities in this district. If the City Staff could suggest a template and possibly let the neighbors add or subtract from the list I believe a Cultural Arts District could be established. Thanks - A L A N O S T N E R, A.S.L.A. Howell + Vancuren, Inc. Landscape Architecture+Master Planning+Site Planning 110 West Meadow Avenue Fayetteville, AR 72701-5229 479.575.0204 phone aostner.@howelivancuren.com www.howelivancuren.com 9/4/2007 CARAV/AY ST �T .r „� ■ Cultural Arts District ! �i REBECCA ST AYLOR ST , xr._ T m ■wF i._._> RENTO ' J � i !� _ _. _ 4S■ " N BLVD _ Aw� 11 f ! +� w _� T LOUISE ST - W ■ DX LU ., w ! ¢ j DAVIDSON ST _...-- DAVIDSON ST -- 3 ■ Mrs l `z - - ILA ST _ z Y itlliY ■fi LU 0Q ! i one it J ■, * ■ ■ , w • > M / . 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